snag


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snag

1. a small loop or hole in a fabric caused by a sharp object
2. Engineering a projection that brings to a stop a sliding or rotating component
3. Chiefly US and Canadian a tree stump in a riverbed that is dangerous to navigation
4. US and Canadian a standing dead tree, esp one used as a perch by an eagle

snag

[snag]
(forestry)
A standing dead tree.

snag

An unserviceability or a fault condition in an aircraft or equipment.

snag

References in periodicals archive ?
Ibrahim Baraka, director of Al Shula School in Sharjah, said the exams went off smoothly after the students were given printed question papers and they wrote the answers on the sheets, so that the electronic snag didn't affect them.
"Workers now have lots of options to pick up shifts -- Instacart, TaskRabbit, Postmates, Lyft," said Peter Harrison, chief executive of Snag, the parent company of Snag Work, which says it has 2.1 million active users.
The consequences for low-wage workers could be far-reaching, labour advocates said, if companies like Snag Work encourage businesses to hire temporary workers at the expense of permanent employees.
As most snags occur while lures are moving forward, lure knockers strike their target front-to-back with a motion intended to push the bait away from its entrapment.
Twenty patients in group A were treated with Mulligan SNAGs and 17 patients in group B with McKenzie EEP for four weeks at two session per week and single session per day.
The flight AI 143, a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, got delayed due to the snag and that apparently angered the pilot.
Built around a highly skeletonized mag pouch of plastic or kydex-type material, it has a metal clip and a nifty "snag" protrusion that's the magic of it all.
Global Banking News-August 21, 2013--Nykredit sees snag in Basel's net stable funding ratio(C)2013 ENPublishing - http://www.enpublishing.co.uk
Surprised customers, who dialled the bank's call centre to enquire about the strange deposits, were told that it was a technical snag.
At each nest tree or snag (hereafter nest substrate) I recorded habitat variables that included the nest substrate species, decay class Types 1-4 (defined in Table 1; Kozma 2009), height (m), dbh (cm), cavity height (m), slope (%), canopy cover (%), shrub height (m), and presence of fungal fruiting bodies (hereafter conks) on the nest substrate.