snakebite

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snakebite,

wound inflicted by the teeth of a snake. The bite of a nonvenomous snake is rarely serious. Venomous snakes have fangs, hollow teeth through which poison is injected into a victim. All types of snake venom contain a toxin that affects the nerves and tends to paralyze the victim. In addition, the venom of the coral snake, the cobra, and the South American rattlesnake contains constituents that damage blood cells and dissolve the linings of the blood vessels and the lymphatic vessels, causing severe or fatal internal hemorrhage and collapse. First aid for venomous snakebites consists of retarding the spread of the poison through the circulatory system by applying a constricting band or an ice pack, or by spraying ethyl chloride on the wound. It is essential that the patient avoid exertion and the taking of stimulants, as both increase the pulse rate. The constricting band should be applied above the swelling caused by the wound; it should be tight, but not tight enough to stop the pulsing of the blood. If only a few minutes have passed since the infliction of the bite, it is possible to remove much of the poison by suction (see first aidfirst aid,
immediate and temporary treatment of a victim of sudden illness or injury while awaiting the arrival of medical aid. Proper early measures may be instrumental in saving life and ensuring a better and more rapid recovery.
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). Antivenins, which counteract the toxins, are available for most types of snake venom. The two main groups of poisonous snakes in the United States are the coral snakes, which rarely attack humans unless provoked, and the pit vipers (copperhead, cottonmouth moccasin, the various rattlers), which require no provocation.

snakebite

1. a bite inflicted by a snake, esp a venomous one
2. a drink of cider and lager
References in periodicals archive ?
It could be used as an adjuvant therapy for snakebites and improve the toxic symptoms observed in local tissues.
In 2014 and 2016, about 62 per cent of claims received were from snakebites.
The danger/potency of a snakebite often depends on the amount of venom injected by the snake and the type of toxins in the venom, which can vary depending on species of snake.
4] have advocated the use of ultrasound as a painless and non-invasive technique of diagnosing compartment syndrome in snakebites.
Using data from a nationwide household survey conducted in Sri Lanka between 2012 and 2013, researchers found that 79 percent of snakebite victims suffered economic loss after the incident, with a median income loss of $28.
The Medical and Health Department routinely collects information concerning incident of snakebite on weekly basis under Integrated Disease Surveillance Program from all health-care providers as presumptive surveillance.
To try to avoid snakebites altogether, stay on open paths while hiking with your pet.
Studies signify that primary care treating doctors hesitate to treat snakebite patients immediately mainly due to lack of experience and confidence.
As part of my work as a hospital physician and teacher I came across numerous cases of snakebite and was appalled to find so little was known about the species of snakes responsible, and also that there was a lack of specific treatment.
MAKILALA -- King cobras are descending on a village in this town as a result of habitat loss, prompting village officials to turn their ire on the snakes following the death of a resident due to snakebite last week.