snakebite

(redirected from snakebites)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

snakebite,

wound inflicted by the teeth of a snake. The bite of a nonvenomous snake is rarely serious. Venomous snakes have fangs, hollow teeth through which poison is injected into a victim. All types of snake venom contain a toxin that affects the nerves and tends to paralyze the victim. In addition, the venom of the coral snake, the cobra, and the South American rattlesnake contains constituents that damage blood cells and dissolve the linings of the blood vessels and the lymphatic vessels, causing severe or fatal internal hemorrhage and collapse. First aid for venomous snakebites consists of retarding the spread of the poison through the circulatory system by applying a constricting band or an ice pack, or by spraying ethyl chloride on the wound. It is essential that the patient avoid exertion and the taking of stimulants, as both increase the pulse rate. The constricting band should be applied above the swelling caused by the wound; it should be tight, but not tight enough to stop the pulsing of the blood. If only a few minutes have passed since the infliction of the bite, it is possible to remove much of the poison by suction (see first aidfirst aid,
immediate and temporary treatment of a victim of sudden illness or injury while awaiting the arrival of medical aid. Proper early measures may be instrumental in saving life and ensuring a better and more rapid recovery.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Antivenins, which counteract the toxins, are available for most types of snake venom. The two main groups of poisonous snakes in the United States are the coral snakes, which rarely attack humans unless provoked, and the pit vipers (copperhead, cottonmouth moccasin, the various rattlers), which require no provocation.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

snakebite

1. a bite inflicted by a snake, esp a venomous one
2. a drink of cider and lager
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Kalantri, "Central retinal artery occlusion: an unusual complication of snakebite," Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins Including Tropical Diseases, vol.
The incidence of snakebites for the Cariri region was calculated for the period from 2007 to 2010.
The exit of the company meant that many African countries had to rely on non-effective anti-venoms manufactured from non-African snakes, which could not treat bites from the local snakes, resulting into a treatment crisis.Prof Mike Turner, director of science at Welcome Trust, a biomedical research foundation, points out that the global burden of death and disability due to snakebites is comparable to cervical or prostate cancer.
The World Health Organization (WHO)on Thursday (https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/312195/WHO-CDS-NTD-NZD-2019.03-eng.pdf?ua=1) unveiled a strategy : "Snakebite Envenoming: A Strategy For Prevention and Control" on how to better manage this global health crisis.
The aim of the strategy is to halve the numbers of deaths and cases of disability due to snakebite envenoming over the next 12 years through a programme that targets affected communities and their health systems, and by ensuring access to safe, effective treatment through increased cooperation, collaboration and partnership at all levels.
This was a retrospective chart review study, and it revealed that snakebites were managed differently by different treating physicians based on their clinical judgment.
In view of the increasing snakebite incidents, people have demanded that the district administration take measures to counter such attacks in future.
The invention is an ethanolic extract of fruits from the Ajwa date palm to treat local haemorrhage and oedema caused by snakebites.
Souza et al., "StructureBased Discovery of Thiosemicarbazone Metalloproteinase Inhibitors for Hemorrhage Treatment in Snakebites," ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, vol.