snakeroot


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Related to snakeroot: white snakeroot, Indian snakeroot

snakeroot,

name for several plants, among them black snakeroot (see bugbanebugbane,
any plant of the genus Cimicifuga, tall north-temperate perennials of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercup family). The white spirelike bloom has a rank odor that attracts flies, which pollinate the plant. Common in woodlands of E North America is C.
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), button snakeroot or blazing starblazing star
or button snakeroot,
any plant of the genus Liatris, showy North American perennials of the family Asteraceae (aster family). The blossoms, rosy purple or white, are in somewhat feathery heads along a usually wandlike stalk.
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, senega snakeroot (see milkwortmilkwort,
common name for the Polygalaceae, a family including herbs, shrubs, and trees found in all parts of the world except New Zealand and the polar regions. Several milkworts (genus Polygala
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), and white snakerootwhite snakeroot,
North American woods perennial (Eupatorium urticifolium) of the family Asteraceae (aster family), having a flat-topped cluster of small white flowers. It is of the same genus as the boneset and joe-pye weed.
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several herbaceous plants and woody vines, commonly regarded as forest herbs, were more prominent in 2008, including Aquilegia canadensis (columbine), Solidago ulmifolia (elm-leaved goldenrod), Sanicula odorata (common black snakeroot), Smilax tamnoides (greenbriar) and Menispermum canadense (moonseed) (Table 1).
A member of the buttercup family, black cohosh is a perennial plant native to North America that also is known as black snakeroot, bugbane, bugwort, rattleroot, rattletop, rattleweed and macrotys, according to the National Institutes of Health.
Snakeroot, snakeweed, requiring transplant; industry and
Dirty Dozen: 12 Supplements to Avoid Name(s) Dangers Regulatory Actions DEFINITELY HAZARDOUS: Documented organ failure or known carcinogenic properties Aristolochic acid Potent human carcinogen; FDA warning to (Aristolochia, kidney failure, sometimes consumers and industry birthwort, requiring transplant; deaths and import alert in snakeroot, reported.
"If you don't ask, you won't be told." Dirty Dozen: 12 Supplements to Avoid Name(s) Dangers Regulatory Actions DEFINITELY HAZARDOUS: Documented organ failure or known carcinogenic properties Aristolochic acid Potent human carcinogen; FDA warning to (Aristolochia, birthwort, kidney failure, consumers and snakeroot, snakeweed, sometimes requiring industry and import sangree root, sangrel, transplant; deaths alert in April serpentary, serpentaria, reported.
Dirty Dozen: 12 Supplements to Avoid Name(s) Dangers Regulatory Actions DEFINITELY HAZARDOUS: Documented organ failure or known carcinogenic properties Aristolochic acid Potent human FDA warning to (Aristolochia, carcinogen; kidney consumers and birthwort, snakeroot, failure, sometimes industry and import snakeweed, sangree requiring transplant; alert in April 2001.
We encountered only 33 Virginia snakeroot (Aristolochia serpentaria L.) ramets and 45 ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) ramets in the entire sampled area (4 ha).
An even more vivid demonstration focused on the snakeroot, Cimicifuga simplex, which grows in three forms, each with its own habitats, pollinators, and scents.
ALSO called black snakeroot, from the roots of a perennial plant grown in Canada and parts of the US.
AExtracts of the echinacea plant (snakeroot) are said to boost immunity and protect against infections, but doctors need hard evidence of effectiveness and safety before recommending anything to patients.
The root of seneca snakeroot (Polygala senega L.) has been used for centuries by aboriginal peoples in North America as a treatment for various ailments.