Alpheidae

(redirected from snapping shrimp)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to snapping shrimp: pistol shrimp

Alpheidae

[‚al′fē·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The snapping shrimp, a family of decapod crustaceans that is included in the section Caridea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Snapping shrimp, or pistol shrimp, as they're sometimes called, use that supersized appendage to make their distinctive sound.
The snapping shrimp Synalpheus "brooksi" actually comprises a complex of at least four cryptic species that are extremely similar morphologically but are distinguished by subtle differences in color, in the suite of hosts used, and by fixed allozyme differences (J.
Snapping shrimp, in the genera Alpheus and Synalpheus, inhabit mostly shallow, tropical and subtropical waters worldwide.
Only in particular groups of stomatopods (Hatziolos and Caldwell, 1983; Christy and Salmon, 1991; Marshall et al., 1999) and in the snapping shrimp Alpheus heterochaelis (Hughes, 1996) are visual signals known to play an important role during intersexual communication, probably because both species live in tropical waters where visibility usually is high.
High-speed video and fancy math have overturned an old theory about how snapping shrimp make such a racket.
If broadcast sounds can be bad, they can also be good, reasoned Gene Eisenmann, the guy behind a new device called the HydroWave, which uses a transducer to broadcast, at the touch of a button, the sounds of snapping shrimp, grunting croakers, mullet doing whatever mullet do, etc.
Snapping shrimp (Alpheus heterochaelis Say) were also collected in low densities, but did contribute to community assemblage differences (Table 2).
In the snapping shrimp Alpheus heterochaelis Say, eyestalk ablation performed early in larval development has profound effects on morphogenesis, causing the appearance of supernumerary larval stages, accompanied by retardation and even complete arrest of morphogenesis.
Researchers know little about the 100 or so other species in the genus, Duffy says, but divers who explore Caribbean coral reefs are familiar with the loud crackling sound-similar to that of frying bacon-produced by snapping shrimp. He analyzed more than 30 shrimp colonies inhabiting sponges in the coral reefs of Carrie Bow Cay, Belize.
Mark found the diminutive snapping shrimp on the menu.