snark

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snark

[Lewis Carroll, via the Michigan Terminal System] 1. A system failure. When a user's process bombed, the operator would get the message "Help, Help, Snark in MTS!"

2. More generally, any kind of unexplained or threatening event on a computer (especially if it might be a boojum). Often used to refer to an event or a log file entry that might indicate an attempted security violation. See snivitz.

3. UUCP name of snark.thyrsus.com, home site of the Hacker Jargon File versions 2.*.*.

snark

elusive imaginary animal. [Br. Lit.: The Hunting of the Snark]
See: Quarry
References in periodicals archive ?
"There she goes, playing the victim, again," one Swift Snarks, which is likely playing on media criticism of herself.
The importance of these graphs arises also from the fact that several well known conjectures would have snarks as minimal counterexamples [10], among them Tutte's 5-Flow Conjecture [28], the 1-Factor Double Cover Conjecture [15], and the Cycle Double Cover Conjecture [24, 26].
The Petersen graph is the smallest and earliest known snark. It is known that there are no snarks of order 12, 14 or 16 (see for example [13, 14]).
reported that their extensive computer study of snarks shows that all snarks of girth at least 5 and with less than 30 vertices are Type 1, and asked for the smallest order of a snark of girth at least 5 that is Type 2.
Snarks are cyclically 4-edge-connected cubic graphs that do not allow a 3-edge-coloring.
Definition 4 Let [S.sub.1], [S.sub.2] be disjoint snarks, [B.sub.1] = ([V.sub.1], [E.sub.1], [S.sub.1]) a direct-brick of [S.sub.1] with vertex pairs [r.sub.1], [r.sub.2] and [s.sub.1], [s.sub.2] and [B.sub.2] = ([V.sub.2], [E.sub.2], [S.sub.2]) an edge-brick of [S.sub.2] with vertex pairs [x.sub.1], [x.sub.2] and [y.sub.1], [y.sub.2].
Definition 5 Let [S.sub.1], [S.sub.2] be two disjoint snarks, [B.sub.1] be a direct-brick of [S.sub.1] with vertex pairs [r.sub.1], [r.sub.2] and [s.sub.1], [s.sub.2] and [B.sub.2] be an edge-brick of [S.sub.2] with vertex pairs [x.sub.1], [x.sub.2] and [y.sub.1], [y.sub.2].
This is covered in the next article in the series, 'Seeking the Snarks' -- (the snark is a mythical and hard to find creature in Lewis Carol's poem by the same name).
In academic art journals, High Pink would be greeted with hosannas to "interpositionality." The "Vassar-educated, art history major" and "Linda Ronstadt-look alike" that Mondini-Ruiz snarks so mercilessly offer easy prey for facile interpretations in light of the author's multiple identities as a gay man, a Latino, a New Yorker, and an artist.
While Carroll was writing up his antivivisection pieces for the popular press, he was also engaged in the composition of his most ambitious nonsense poem, The Hunting of the Snark (1876).
Carroll's term for such linguistic hybrids was "the portmanteau word"; as he notes in his Introduction to The Hunting of the Snark: "this poem is to some extent connected with the lay of the Jabberwock," and, as in that earlier nonsense poem, the "hard words" in the Snark can be explained by "Humpty Dumpty's theory, of two meanings packed into one word like a portmanteau" (p.
Scrutinized on a minute scale, pursued as an exotic delicacy for the dining fork, threatened by industrial development, petted, charmed, washed, and domesticated, the Snark is an amorphous figure for the nonhuman animal of the nineteenth century.