sneeze


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sneeze,

involuntary violent expiration of air through the nose and mouth. It results from stimulation of the nervous system in the nose, causing sudden contraction of the muscles of expiration. The stimulus can include any irritating factor in the nose—inflammation of the tissues as the result of a cold or infection, allergic irritants (hay feverhay fever,
seasonal allergy causing inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose and eyes. It is characterized by itching about the eyes and nose, sneezing, a profuse watery nasal discharge, and tearing of the eyes.
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), or irritating substances such as dust or pollutants in the air. An occasional sneeze usually has little significance. Repeated sneezing indicates that some condition of the nose or in the immediate atmosphere requires attention.

sneeze

[snēz]
(physiology)
A sudden, noisy, spasmodic expiration through the mouth and nose.
References in periodicals archive ?
A single sneeze travels at 100mph and can spread over 100,000 germs.
The best way to sneeze is into a tissue, and failing that, into the crook of your elbow.
What's more, when patients did sneeze, that didn't seem to add much to the viral count in the samples, Milton's group added.
ISLAMABAD -- If you are about to sneeze, then don't try to stop it by pinching your nose and closing your mouth, as according to doctors, it can rupture throat, burst an ear drum and even pop a blood vessel in brain.
LONDON Tempted to stifle a loud or untimely sneeze? Let it out instead, doctors in England warned Monday based on the very unusual case of a man who ruptured the back of his throat when he tried to suppress a sneeze.
Doctors warned stifling a sneeze can be dangerous after one man ruptured the back of his throat while doing so, reports The Guardian.
The 34-year-old patient told them his problems started after he tried to stop a forceful sneeze by pinching his nose and closing his mouth.
Stifling a sneeze can rupture your throat, burst an ear drum, or pop a blood vessel in your brain, researchers warned on Tuesday.
PINCHING your nose while you sneeze can rupture the back of your throat, doctors have warned.
The principle of majority rule is nothing to sneeze at--unless you're a wild dog.
This action is called "reverse" sneezing because air is going in, not out as in a typical sneeze. It is generally caused by a spasm of the soft palate on the roof of your dog's mouth.