sneezeweed


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Related to sneezeweed: bitter sneezeweed

sneezeweed,

name for any plant of the genus Helenium, American meadow and field herbs of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family), with daisylike heads of yellow (or occasionally purple) flowers. A few of the more attractive sneezeweeds are cultivated in gardens, such as varieties of H. autumnale, the most common species of E North America. The bitter sap of some sneezeweeds (e.g., H. tenuifolium, a Southern plant also called bitterweed) imparts a disagreeable flavor to the milk of cows that graze on them. Sneezeweeds are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
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sneezeweed

sneezeweed

Yellow daisy-like flowers with globular middle, angled stems. Sometimes called “Swamp Sunflower” because it likes to grow near water in sand. Tea made from flowers used for intestinal worms. Contains a strong anti-cancer lactone recognized by National Cancer Institute. Ok for humans, but too strong (poisonous) for animals, worms and insects. Keep away from grazing animals.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
References in periodicals archive ?
Virginia sneezeweed, which is federally listed as threatened, grows on the moist borders of seasonally wet sinkhole ponds and meadows in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and in the Ozark Highlands of Missouri.
In 1998, the Virginia sneezeweed was listed as threatened.
autumnale: common sneezeweed. Frequent in the Sugar Creek floodplain; 577; 557; &; C = 3.
Virginia Sneezeweed (Helenium virginicum) Despite its unappealing common name, this plant is a wildflower that poses little threat to pollen-sufferers.
Their flowers come mostly in colors with character: Golden yellows that stand up to strong sun now, then later in the season burn like embers under gray skies--gloriosa daisies, coreopsis, and goldenrod, for example, Coppers, rusts, and wine reds that forecast the shades of falling leaves, such as the flowers on Sedum 'Autumn Joy', purple coneflower, or sneezeweed (Helenium) hybrids.
Helenium autumnale L.: Common Sneezeweed; common; wet fields, meadows and riverbanks; BSUH 10509.
But when it comes to the daisy-like flowers of Helenium, it seems more appropriate to use Latin than its common name of sneezeweed.
TOP 10 Late shrubs YOU can ignite your fading flower beds with sneezeweeds. They produce daisy-like blooms that come in a range of shades from deep red to pale yellow, including blends, stripes and bands of colour.
The sneezeweeds, Helenium, are late flowering perennials with large daisy-like flowers.
(13) See Of Sneezeweeds and Hot-spots, by Kerry Goldstein, found at http://www.urich.edu/ ~journalm/outlook/goldstein2.html; Wildlands Recovery in a Human-dominated Landscape: Foundations of a Central Appalachian Restoration Strategy by Nathaniel P.
The sneezeweeds, helenium, are late-flowering perennials with large daisy-like flower heads.