snick


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snick

1. a knot in thread, etc.
2. Cricket
a. a glancing blow off the edge of the bat
b. the ball so hit
References in periodicals archive ?
The first was to find a place of serenity in the immutability of Van Snick's work.
"We couldn't find enough room in the stores for all the pictures we received," says Van Snick. "And our pet food business increased 10%."
Snick's marketing strategies, increase in the economy, and production capabilities assisted in this growth.
The first one becoming popular, back in the early 1970's or so, was actually called the "Snick" because of the noise it made when the plastic parts of its breakfront design snapped back together as the gun cleared.
Ever heard of a Snick? Mike Horne and Mike Harries were clever long before clever was cool, and any Kydex worth a crap traces a lineage to the Snick.
I think of the blade in the workshop, the snick of the file, each tiny cascade of fire, each tooth ground to a fine edge.
Now boasting the ripe old age of 27, Taylor has Pakistan wicketkeeper Kamran Akmal to thank as first a snick went begging through the slips and then an even more straightforward catch behind was fumbled when he was on eight.
Other footage did reportedly detect an incriminating snick.
The "snick rule" where a batsman was lbw when he had hit the ball.
However, just as England began to coast, Ben Hilfenhaus enduced a snick off Colly and Pietersen, on 69, badly miscued a pre-meditated sweep from wide of off-stump to Hauritz.
Five ensnaring deliveries of skipper Jenkins' spin failed to induce the error but with his sixth and final ball of the year, a snick to wicketkeeper Dave Taylor standing up produced the wicket to leave Bay winners by 38 runs.
Skipper Atherton was lucky to get away with a snick between wicket keeper and slip before he departed for seven, caught by Tendulkar from Prasad's bowling.