snooker


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snooker

1. a game played on a billiard table with 15 red balls, six balls of other colours, and a white cue ball. The object is to pot the balls in a certain order
2. a shot in which the cue ball is left in a position such that another ball blocks the object ball. The opponent is then usually forced to play the cue ball off a cushion
www.worldsnooker.com
References in periodicals archive ?
She was fast-tracked in 2001, becoming an inspiration for the growing number of woman officials within snooker.
The programme also spawned one of the most iconic quotes in snooker history when commentator Ted Lowe remarked: "For those of you who are watching in black and white, the pink is next to the green.
Edward Foden at St Lukes Church Hall's Snooker Club which is looking for a new venue after 100 years.
His son-in law Daren Holland said: "There will be so many players in the league that would have known him and known what he did for local snooker, not forgetting the years of playing cricket.
The championships were founded by Brummie businessman Bill Camkin, who owned several snooker halls and made and sold snooker tables and cues.
They qualified to represent the country as they occupied the top two slots in the 37th National Snooker Championship earlier this year.
Snooker Legends, at Venue Cymru on June 12, will also feature John Virgo, who will compere the show as well as showing off some of his famous trick shots, and Michaela Tabb, the former pool player who became the first woman to referee the World Championship final.
In the Junior Snooker event UAE's snooker protege Khalid Ali Kamali gave yet another brilliant performance to down his Bahraini opponent four frames to one.
Summary: John Higgins has been banned for six months and fined Au75,000 but cleared of accepting a bribe to fix snooker matches.
RONNIE O'SULLIVAN is ready to return to the snooker halls where he honed his amazing talent rather than suffer on the game's biggest stage.
After a tough few years which saw one respected tournament sponsor cite 'economic difficulties' as the reason for its withdrawal and another was forced out by government legislation, the snooker business could do with a night similar to the one in 1985 when Dennis Taylor beat Steve Davis by potting the final black in the last frame of the Embassy World Championship final.
PROMOTIONS kingpin Barry Hearn has revealed his ambitious plans to revolutionise snooker and make it big business once again.