snow blindness


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snow blindness

[′snō ‚blīnd·nəs]
(medicine)
A transient visual impairment and actinic keratoconjunctivitis caused by exposure of the eyes to ultraviolet rays reflected from snow. Also known as solar photophthalmia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protective eyewear or goggles that block at least 90 percent of ultraviolet radiation can help prevent snow blindness, and sunglasses with visible light transmittance in the 5 to 10 percent range are needed to reduce the sun's reflection off snow.
Sunglasses are vital, as snow blindness can cause permanent damage to corneas.
This ta sk is complicated by the difficulty of reading the white text as it fades in and out of the black-and-white images, which results in a kind of snow blindness.
Walking over bright, snow-covered ridges, basically blindfolded to prevent snow blindness, was an interesting exercise in navigation.
Ultraviolet-induced keratoconjunctivitis, sometimes called snow blindness, often is observed a few hours after skiing, sunbathing, or arc welding.
Overexposure to UV rays has been linked to cataracts; benign growths on the eye's surface; cancer of the eyelids and skin around the eye; and photokeratitis, sometimes called snow blindness, which is a temporary but painful sunburn of the eye's surface.
A lesser known danger of sun exposure, however, is the more immediate risk of sunburnt eyes or photokeratitis, also termed ultraviolet keratitis or snow blindness.
Surviving wolf attacks and snow blindness, and living on raw caribou meat, the party finally made it to Bathurst Inlet.
Washington, May 27 (ANI): Ultraviolet (UV) light that causes the temporary but painful condition of snow blindness in humans is life-saving for reindeer in the arctic, according to a new study.
Fortunately there were no cases of photokeratitis snow blindness amongst the ice flows since most passengers wore dark glasses to protect themselves from the ultraviolet radiation.
However, problems with exhaution and health problems caused by poor nutrition, along with frostbite and snow blindness led the men to turn back.