snow fence


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snow fence

[′snō ‚fens]
(civil engineering)
An open-slatted board fence usually 4 to 10 feet (1.2 to 3.0 meters) high, placed about 50 feet (15 meters) on the windward side of a railroad track or highway; the fence serves to disrupt the flow of the wind so that the snow is deposited close to the fence on the leeward side, leaving a comparatively clear, protected strip parallel to the fence and slightly farther downwind.

snow guard

snow guards (two types)
Any device intended to prevent snow from sliding off a sloping roof.
References in periodicals archive ?
The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) released a report that explains the design, installation, and maintenance of its living snow fences, a form of passive snow control.
One of the best tricks is to hang a four-foot section of wooden snow fence directly behind a treestand to break up my profile.
The fourth used a porous snow fence that provided some shade, but allowed sunlight to filter through.
Wood or plastic snow fence (or chicken wire) can be used to make a composter that is cheap and very easy to set up.
The cadets planted 300 lilac saplings to create a living snow fence, and then planted sunflower seeds on either side to shelter the young lilacs.
BII Fence & Guardrail Bridge, Snow Fence Installation
Each club's 40 images were given to photographic judge David Flitcroft, of Anglesey, with no information about the originating club - although some had giveaway titles such as Carneddau Snow Fence and Kangaroo Valley!
A father loses his job, and still in his salesman wingtip shoes, hits fly ball after fly ball to his son standing behind the snow fence in center.
This area even features an old wooden snow fence, used at some beaches to control sand piles.
I remember growing up in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and watching out the school bus window as the snow fence appeared alongside the roads each fall.
Several products were generated by the SHRP research such as: road weather information systems (RWIS), anti-icing procedures and strategies, new snowplow and snow fence designs, and tests to evaluate deicer chemicals.
Try to add something new every year - little things that let them feel that the program is always improving, like: digging and building a new pitcher's mound, putting up a donated snow fence in the outfield, announcing the starting lineups over an intercom, or getting a teacher or a talented student to sing the national anthem.