snowshoes


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snowshoes,

footgear enabling the wearer to walk on soft snow without sinking. A snowshoe consists of a light frame of tough wood or aluminum, roughly the shape of a large tennis racket, which is strung with caribou skin or other material and is attached to the shoe in back of a central crossbar in the frame. A primitive form of snowshoe is that used by the Eskimo and Native North Americans, but the designs differ considerably. The Eskimo use one shape that is triangular, about 18 in. (46 cm) in length, and another that is nearly circular. The Cree, farther south, use a long narrow hunting shoe, about 6 ft (2 m) in length; in open country and for speed this type is the most suitable. The toes are slightly turned up to prevent catching if there is a crust on the snow. The shoes worn by lumbermen are about 3.5 ft (1 m) long and proportionately broad, while a tracker's shoe is at least 5 ft (1.5 m) long and very narrow. Manufactured snowshoes are often made with the moccasin attached. Snowshoe races are now popular at winter carnivals, and the sport is governed in the United States and Canada by the International Snow-Shoe Congress.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's a good idea to rent snowshoes before buying a pair.
When Mount Hoy is open for snow tubing, rent snowshoes at the base until 2 p.m.
The super–light snowshoes boast top traction and a host of detailing, such as glove–friendly bindings.
Traveling without a map, Snowshoe used the sun and stars for navigation.
Snowshoes function best when there is enough snow beneath them to pack a layer between them and the ground, usually at a depth of 8 inches or more.
Arctic Peoples invented the snowshoe about 12,000 years ago.
Made by Redfeather Snowshoes Inc., Denver, (800) 525-0081, www.redfeather.com.
Maine, for example, allows "rabbit" hunting without differentiating species, although snowshoe hares are the prime species taken.
Katherine Monk's Weird Sex & Snowshoes, unfortunately, puts too much emphasis on being serious and not enough on basic academic research, and Canadian cinema suffers yet another blow at the hands of one of its well-meaning, high-minded supporters.
To speed its new snowshoe from the final design stage to market introduction, Spring Brook Manufacturing, of Grand Junction, Colo., enlisted the aid of a rapid prototype (RP) development company, Accelerated Technologies, Inc.
25 With Snowshoes and Camera, Clair Tappaan Lodge, California, March 5-10, Delight in the opportunities snowshoes provide for exploring the Sierra in winter as we learn from nature photographer Paul McKown.