soapstone


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soapstone

or

steatite

(stē`ətīt), metamorphic rock of which the characteristic and usually chief mineral is talctalc,
mineral ranging in color from white through various shades of gray and green to the red and brown of impure specimens, translucent to opaque, and having a greasy, soapy feel.
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, but which also contains varying parts of chlorite, mica, tremolite, quartz, magnetite, and iron compounds. It is gray to green in color, has a soapy feel, and is notable for its high degree of resistance to acids and heat. It is so soft that it can be easily cut with a knife or other sharp tool, making it a popular material for sculpting. The chief deposits of commercial importance are in the United States, Norway, and Canada. It is used in the manufacture of laboratory table tops, kitchen sinks, laundry tubs, furnace linings, and electrical apparatus.

Soapstone

 

a dense, dark greenish-gray rock, consisting basically of an aggregate of tiny flakes of talc and chlorite. Dolomite, magnesite, and other magnesium-calcium carbonates are also commonly found in soapstone. It can easily be cut with a knife and is formed as a result of metamorphosis and hydrochemical transformation of ultrabasic serpentine rock, diabases, and magnesian schists. Soapstone is used in the manufacture of dishes, pots, and jugs in Iran, Turkey, India, and Afghanistan. It has technological applications as a heat-resistant material. In the USSR deposits of soapstone are found in the Karelian ASSR and in the Urals.

soapstone

[′sōp‚stōn]
(mineralogy)
A mineral name applied to steatite or to massive talc. Also known as soaprock.
(petrology)
A metamorphic rock characterized by massive, schistose, or interlaced fibrous texture and a soft unctuous feel.

soapstone

Massive soft rock that contains a high proportion of talc; used as dimension stone for laboratory sinks, bench tops, carved ornaments, and electrical panels. Also see steatite.

soapstone

a massive compact soft variety of talc, used for making tabletops, hearths, ornaments, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rich historical but fragmentary pieces of evidence point to substantive early excavation and exploitation of soapstone among the Kisiis as early as 1890s.
Revenue being generated and deposited in the national exchequer from the mines has stopped after the closure, they said, adding that everything was going well but certain people denied accepting paying Rs5,000 per soapstone truck to Haji Khel tribe under a deal after a dispute on mountain ownership.
Soapstone and slate should be oiled with mineral oil several times a year, which will help them resist staining.
339) is a fascinating, yet frustrating topic for which he admits that "perhaps we have not cracked the 'code for children' in the Saqqaq archaeological record yet, or alternatively the archaeological picture may reflect that the concept of childhood in Saqqaq times was different from the Inuit's concepts." Though it is noted that glimpses of children are potentially offered by tiny round soapstone lamps and a few models or miniatures, the author also suggests that perhaps "Saqqaq society did not consider 'childhood' as a social category"--which, if true, is a curious explanation that might be further explored cross-culturally.
The following properties of the soapstone make this material interesting to study
Interestingly, the first piece Arcand ever carved was an eagle head in soapstone. He carved it on the balcony of his St.
This extensive network of members allows the organization to offer the highest quality granite, marble, soapstone and wood surfaces imported from the best sources around the globe.
Materials that are common to both Maces include amethyst, black quartz, citrine, garnet, granite, lapis lazuli, silver, soapstone, quartz and white marble.
A nine-year-old Cree boy is visited by a master soapstone carver who gives him four pieces of soapstone.
Fleur de Lys today is probably best known as the site of a soapstone quarry, exploited by Dorset Paleoeskimos, between AD 400 and 800.
The first-prize winner was the Ideal Steel Hybrid stove produced by Woodstock Soapstone. This hybrid stove has a catalytic combustor and a secondary combustion system.