sob sister


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sob sister

journalist who handles advice to lovelorn column. [Am. Journalism: Brewer Dictionary, 1016]
References in periodicals archive ?
Male screenwriters, perhaps worded that these sob sisters were too independent and too feisty for the times, would make sure that, by the final reel, these self-sufficient females would succumb to love, longing for what 1930s audiences were sure every woman really wanted--a man, marriage, and children.
Such reporting is "so mawkish and so soppy that only those who were unusually stalwart or unconsciously insensitive could keep from shedding a tear," according to Phyllis Leslie Abramson in her book, Sob Sister Journalism.
Sob Sisters was directed by Butt himself and ran to just seven half-hour episodes from May to July, 1989.
In what is presented as the first study of actual and fictional newspaperwomen at the turn of the 20th century, one-time reporter Lutes (English, Villanova U.) examines their roles as stunt reporters (e.g., Nelly Bly), "sob sisters," and agents and objects of emergent mass culture.
From Children's Hospital to Vanessa, Esther and the rest of the sob sisters, TV intrudes on grief and into private lives far, far more than papers ever do, or dare.
After all, if you had asked the yellow-ribbon sob sisters ten years ago whether they would expect a United States expedition to the Persian Gulf to risk everything in order to restore Iran to its position as master of the region, they might well have answered no.
When Charles and Diana were still the darlings of Fleet Street's sob sisters as the Queen celebrated her Forty Glorious Years on the throne, there were calls - deja vu anybody?