social bot

social bot

(social roBOT) A program on the Internet that generates or repeats messages on social media such as Facebook and Twitter with the intent to sway its audience. Bots reside in the background and automatically spring into action based on certain events. For example, the social bots that influence U.S. elections look for known divisive subjects on Twitter and retweet new postings in huge quantities to agitate audiences on both sides of a position. They also spread fictitious stories created in phony accounts. See bot and botnet.
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But as Leonard (1998) predicted decades ago in Bots: The Origins of New Species, bots are evolving and their most recent form, the social bot, has the capacity to enact systematic and measurable influence because of critical changes in its environment.
In 2014, the security company Bit-defender picked up a social bot using names including "Aaliyah" that was stalking men on the casual-dating app Tinder.
Marketing products with these bots is an obvious task: Nanis describes a social bot that might post a Twitter picture of the African savanna with the tweet "this Nikon camera really was the best choice
They include Hoaxy, a system for tracking competing claims and fact checking that spread online; and Botometer, a machine-learning algorithm for detecting social bots on Twitter.
Social bots and micro-targeted ads can influence elections, so we desperately need a solution to this issue.
It called for closer online monitoring and for using legal instruments "to delete the social bots and fake accounts through which anti-Semitic hate speech is spread".
The Twitter world is an ecosystems where individuals communicate in blurbs of thoughts and redactions of reason, the modern form of discourse, and it is here that the cutting edge social bots find greatest acceptance as human beings.
By 2015, efforts to systematize and automate social engagement will result in the rise of social bots - automated software agents that can handle, to varying degrees, interaction with communities of users in a manner personalized to each individual.
By 2015, efforts to systematize and automate social engagement will result in the rise of social bots -- automated software agents that can handle, to varying degrees, interaction with communities of users in a manner personalized to each individual.
The literature has also addressed a new class of more sophisticated social bots best described as software agents mimicking humans, which are harder to detect and combat (Ferrara et al.
Social bots are distinct from declared or spam bots, as they try to appear human (Boshmaf, Muslukhov, Beznosov, & Ripeanu, 2011).