social distance


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social distance

feelings or relations of ‘aloofness and unapproachability’, especially between members of different social strata. Conceptions of social distance are formally institutionalized in extreme systems of SOCIAL STRATIFICATION, such as APARTHEID and CASTE, but informally they exist in all societies. The term was introduced by PARK and Burgess (1924) and popularized by Bogardus (1933), who also formulated a social-distance (or Bogardus) scale, designed to portray the extent of tolerance or intolerance between social groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the participants reported less distant attitudes toward migrants who were white-collar workers, social distance from migrants who were laborers was very large, within the scores 6-7 on the Bogardus scale.
The SD-R ([alpha] = .91), a modified version of the SDS-SU, measured preferred social distance from individuals in recovery from SUDs.
Thus, informed by psychological distance theory and CLT, we conducted three studies to examine if event abstractness and social distance have a joint influence on self-other risk perception differences.
(2011), the reward was divided with one other person of varying social distance from the participant (i.e., Jones & Rachlin, 2006).
H1: The level of support for hypotheses deduced from the pure sociology framework varies inversely with the social distance between those involved in analyzing the evidence and pure sociology's inner core.
Perceived, internalised stigma, social distance and impairment level for people living with leprosy in the leprosy settlement and those living in the surrounding community.
Studies of MHL and social rejection suggest that inaccurate recognition and false beliefs about schizophrenia raise social distance toward those suffering from this disorder (Link, Phelan, Bresnahan, Stueve, & Pescosolido, 1999; Papadopoulos, Leavey, & Vincent, 2002; Taskin et al., 2003).
It was expected that both adolescents and adults who participated in the programme would show a similar increment in mental health knowledge and reduction in stigmatising attitudes and social distance.
Liberman (2002) defined that psychological distance contained four dimensions: temporal distance, spatial distance, social distance and hypotheticality (Baranan et al., 2006; Baranan et al., 2007; Trope et al., 2007; Trope and Liberman, 2010), which together constituted the basic framework of psychological distance.
Following these observations, we concluded that discourse particle functions can be more clearly understood when viewed through the frame of two mutually exclusive categories of socio-pragmatic functions, which are 'to increase social distance' and 'to reduce social distance' (see Tables 2 and 3 in the Appendix).
Eveland, Nathanson, Detenber, and Mcleod (1999) explained that social distance is an important concept that may partially account for variations in TPP gaps.
Another relevant model is based on Bogardus's (1933) social distance theory, which documented the varying degrees of social distance between the dominant U.S.