social reform


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social reform

political and social policies implemented with the aim of eliminating SOCIAL PROBLEMS. Social reform movements, and the bureaucratic administrative structures set up to implement such reforms, can be seen as a major feature differentiating modern industrial societies from earlier societies. A contrast is often made between 'social reform’ which is incremental and gradualist, and social REVOLUTION. Fabians, such as Sidney and Beatrice WEBB (see also FABIAN SOCIETY AND FABIANISM), for example, viewed social reform as a method of'social engineering’ entailing the gradual improvement of provision of services and material goods, rejecting revolutionary change. Some critics have argued that many social reforms are essentially palliatives disguising fundamental social inequalities and problems rather than eliminating them. The reform of the National Health Service in 1974 was intended to improve the delivery of health services, but did little to address the causes of ill- health to be found in the social structure of society. Analysis of social reform also raises questions about the relationship between social science and value judgements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zimmermann (history, Central European U., Budapest) traces the history of poverty policy, social reform, and social policy in Hungary from 1948 to 1914.
The group seeks to bring about social reforms in line with the teachings of Islam.
Lebanon demonstrated the need for more robust social reform and wealth redistribution organized by governments, according to Abdel-Samad.
He told AMs: "We should grasp the opportunity to start the last great social reform."
Childers traces legislative debates, social reform agendas, political struggles, and popular perceptions concerning paternal authority and responsibility to underscore their symbolic centrality in a discourse concerning nation, state, and citizenship and to argue that there existed "a vibrant and critical discussion of paternity in the French state among participants from all across the political spectrum." (11)
Marianne Perciaccante finds among the early settlers of Western New York two kinds of religious disposition--one marked by interest in spiritual fervor and the other by concern for moral order--which she labels "formalist" and "antiformalist." Formalist churches, by which she means Presbyterians and Congregationalists, initially resisted revivalism and supported social reform as a means of extending moral order beyond their congregations.
She also praised Lloyd and Mary Morain's popular 1954 book, Humanism as the Next Step, mentioning the possibility of using it to assist with her social reform programs.
Their observations of America and their place in it are nuanced and complex, but their reality speaks to an inevitable implosion unless there is visionary social reform.
This important book examines the Social Gospel movement and its influence on social reform and social service activity well beyond the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the usual temporal boundaries of the Social Gospel.
Early in the introduction of the book, editor Alison Garland suggests that social reform has taken place within the context of economic adjustment and has often been implemented in an undemocratic manner.
It distracted some ministers from social reform in the late 19th century.

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