social reproduction

social reproduction

  1. the process (including biological reproduction and SOCIALIZATION) by which societies reproduce their social institutions and social structure. It is usually assumed, especially of modern societies, that this process is accompanied by elements of social transformation as well as social reproduction.
  2. (MARXISM) the maintenance of an existing MODE OF PRODUCTION and pattern of social relations within a particular society. Within capitalism, this is seen as the outcome of the continual reproduction and extended reproduction of capital (see ACCUMULATION (OR EXPANDED OR EXTENDED REPRODUCTION) OF CAPITAL AND CIRCUITS OF CAPITAL) and the associated maintenance of existing economic and social relations by recourse to IDEOLOGY. See also CULTURAL REPRODUCTION, ACCUMULATION OF CAPITAL.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2001) 'Vagabond Capitalism and the Necessity of Social Reproduction', Antipode 33(4), 709-728.
Both are essential for social reproduction. One of the most prominent phenomena is the conversion and division of social wholes via the sacrifice of buffaloes as mentioned above.
However, social reproduction and the care work that it entails vary in migrant households.
Early human kinship: from sex to social reproduction. Oxford: Blackwell.
In this article, Di Chiro examines how globalised capitalist production, as well as environmental degradation and climate change, all undermine social reproduction, or a community's ability to survive and thrive.
The patterns of social reproduction in post-apartheid South Africa reinforces patterns of patriarchy inherited from apartheid, and reinforces the surbordinated position of women in society.
Although such questions are epistemological, they also concern basic inequalities that underlie the social reproduction of particular communities of practice who "do" science: the research and development enterprises that translate science into concrete technologies and science and technology policy that governs these arenas.
Thus, the concept of social reproduction associated with the economy of care perceives this work as the sphere in which the workforce is reproduced.
Gender, the state and social reproduction : household insecurity in neo-liberal times.
This is a rich, complex and deeply-researched work that deserves to be read by anyone who is interested in the multi-faceted processes of social reproduction in early modern England.
Readers should make good use of the index to mine this study for the valuable information and stimulating insights that it contains about social reproduction in Portugal and Brazil.
This paradox is another kind of evidence, I think, that the so-called social-symbolic o rder does not seamlessly link social reproduction and sexual reproduction.