social studies of science

social studies of science

the interdisciplinary study of the social context in the production of SCIENCE. As such the approach overlaps with both the SOCIOLOGY OF SCIENCE and the SOCIOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE, as well as the history and the PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE, although those most associated with the approach have increasingly sought to distance themselves from the latter, above all wishing to instate the primacy of an ‘empirical’ approach in social studies of science. Adopting the doctrine of the so-called 'strong version of the sociology of science’ (i.e. that 'science’ has to be explained by the same route as other forms of knowledge or belief, and can have no privileged status as ‘truth’ or be exempt from social explanation), has sometimes led those associated with the approach to be accused of relativism’. However, their intention is simply to place a study of science on the same basis as any other social phenomenon. Advocates of the approach are no more concerned to establish philosophical RELATIVISM than they have been to preserve traditional EPISTEMOLOGY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sherry Turkle, a professor of the social studies of science and technology at MIT who investigated the psychology of people interacting with computers in The Second Self, levels the most substantive criticism of Jibo.
This project is interdisciplinary, drawing on comparative politics, the anthropology of state and economy, political geography, and social studies of science and technology.
It's where we learn to listen, to experience "the joy" of being heard and to understand and develop the capacity for empathy, writes Sherry Turkle, professor of the social studies of science and technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Since the 1980s, social studies of science have greatly contributed to the understanding of many social dimensions of scientific research; yet historians of archaeology have traditionally been reluctant to evaluate the different social facets involved in the production of archaeological knowledge.
Algumas destas discussoes sao colhidas por revistas anglo-saxonias de longa data, como Science, Technology and Human Values, Science as Culture ou Social Studies of Science.
Sherry Turkle, a professor of social studies of science and technology at MIT, has come to similar conclusions.
The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) has been working for over three decades now.
The agency's current President is Austrian Helga Nowotny, professor emeritus of social studies of science at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich.
The candidates usually mentioned are the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK), social studies of science, or social epistemology.
In this special issue of RFR/DRF, entitled 'The Nature of Feminist Studies,' we are pleased to include papers by authors writing in the emerging area of feminist social studies of science and technology (STS).
The odd phenomenon is explained by Sherry Turkle, professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who says: "Children grow up in a culture of video games, action films, fantasy epics and computer programs that all rely on that familiar scenario of almost losing but then regaining total mastery.
For example, the past president of the international Society for Social Studies of Science, feminist sociologist and grounded theorist Susan Leigh Star, chose the theme of "Ways of Knowing" for the 2007 meetings, (re)turning us to the fundamental questions of the sociology of knowledge so important to the "new" science studies.