bentonite

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bentonite

(bĕn`tənīt'): see clayclay,
common name for a number of fine-grained, earthy materials that become plastic when wet. Chemically, clays are hydrous aluminum silicates, ordinarily containing impurities, e.g., potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, or iron, in small amounts.
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bentonite

[′bent·ən‚īt]
(geology)
A clay formed from volcanic ash decomposition and largely composed of montmorillonite and beidellite. Also known as taylorite.

bentonite

A clay, formed from decomposed volcanic ash, with a high content of the mineral montmorillonite; has the capability of absorbing a considerable amount of water, and swells accordingly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of fish-meal and sodium bentonite on daily gain, wool growth, carcass characteristics and ruminal and blood characteristics of lambs fed concentrate diets.
Quik-Gel: Easy-to-mix, finely ground, premium-grade, high-yielding Wyoming sodium bentonite.
Clays are treated and perform differendy, so sodium bentonite can achieve some of the beneficial calcium bentonite properties and vice versa.
Effect of low levels of aflatoxin B1 on performance biochemical parameters and aflatoxin B1 in broilerliver tissues in the presence of monensin and sodium bentonite.
The effect of feed supplemented with different sodium bentonite treatments on broiler performance.
1979): Highly compacted sodium bentonite for isolating rock-deposited radioactive waste products.
The liner, used in environmental sealing/lining applications, uses two layers of a polypropylene nonwoven or contaminant resistant woven geotextile to encapsulate sodium bentonite, a naturally occurring, self-haling clay.
Easy to mix in fresh water, premium grade, exceptional high-yield Wyoming sodium bentonite.
Because green foundry sand byproduct from Waupaca Foundry contains sodium bentonite, properly hydrated and compacted sand can achieve a low hydraulic conductivity, which is the primary characteristic needed for a barrier layer material to contain liquids.
Now, a team of Agricultural Research Service scientists in California--one of America's most wildfire-prone states--has shown that an experimental fire-retardant gel made of sodium bentonite clay, cornstarch, and water may offer better, more affordable protection than gels made from other compounds.