sodium perborate


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sodium perborate

[′sōd·ē·əm pər′bȯr‚āt]
(inorganic chemistry)
NaBO2·H2O2·3H2O A white powder with a saline taste; slightly soluble in water, decomposes in moist air; used in deodorants, in dental compositions, and as a germicide. Also known as peroxydol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sodium perborate is toxic if inhaled, causes serious eye damage, is harmful if swallowed and may cause respiratory irritation.
The first description of the walking bleach technique with a mixture of sodium perborate and distilled water was mentioned in a congress report by Marsh and published by Salvas
glycerine pluronic-F127) polyethylene glycol (PEG) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) povidone sodium hyaluronate BUFFERING AGENT PRESERVATIVE not specified chlorite/peroxide (4) borate (boric acid) chlorite-peroxy citrate compound (CPC) (4) phosphate PHMB trometamol polidronium (5) polyhexanide sodium perborate sorbic acid stabilised oxychlorite (4) Table 3 Typical ingredients of mosturisers (comfort drops); (1) also listed hydroxypropylmethlycellulose (2) e.
Disinfectant Candida albicans median HG Control 8,000 A Sodium perborate 1,325 A (tablets) Vinegar (50%) 1,075 A B Toothpaste (solution) 95 B C Chlorhexidine 0 C digluconate (0.
In this study, before synthetic and polyurethane varnish coating were applied, the wood was impregnated with aqueous borate solutions of boric acid (BA), borax (BX), and sodium perborate (SP).
In Vitro Comparison of Different Types of Sodium Perborate Used for Intracoronal Bleachig of Discoloured Teeth.
The phenolphthalin reagent (Kastle-Meyer reagent) was prepared by reducing phenolphthalein with zinc metal in basic solution and an approximately 20-percent sodium perborate solution was used in the second step of the test (Culliford 1971).
Growth in the consumption of inorganic derivatives (primarily sodium perborate and sodium percarbonate) will result from the increasing demand for non-chlorinated bleach alternatives in a wide variety of cleaning products.
The report says that detergents consume around 240,000tpy B203 annually in the form of sodium perborate.
Compact powder detergents have reversed the trend towards liquid detergents and an improved borate, sodium perborate monohydrate, has been produced in increased quantities to replace sodium perborate tetrahydrate.
The enzyme's compatibility with bleaching agents such as sodium perborate and myriad components in detergent formulations contributes to its commercial potential.
In another market, New Detergent Science Tide, containing enzymes, sodium perborate and a color-safe bleach, is under test and is described as "the biggest cleaning advance in Tide's history"--no small statement for such a dominant brand.