softening point

softening point

[′sȯf·ən·iŋ ‚pȯint]
(physics)
For a substance which does not have a definite melting point, the temperature at which viscous flow changes to plastic flow.

softening point

An index of a bitumen’s fluidity; the temperature at which a bitumen (used in roofing or road construction) softens or melts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Federal claims the softening point of its Slipstream is 434 degrees, high enough to resist heat-instigated change and deliver consistent long-range flight.
This is warmer than most would consider, but it provides venting, will not result in condensation of volatiles, is well below the softening point of the resin, and will not cause bridging.
Tenders are invited for purchase of softening point apparatus in fp division of khri
In asphalt roofing, Ceranovus waxes can be used to stabilize or increase the softening point of commercial, residential or peel-and-stick roofing products while decreasing penetration in desired formulations.
Ceranovus waxes can be used to stabilize or increase the softening point of commercial, residential, or peel-and-stick roofing products while decreasing penetration in desired formulations.
The basic test properties on bitumen and modified bitumen and modified bitumen that the replacement of bitumen by electronic waste reduces the penetration, whereas increases in softening point and specific gravity values.
The Vicat softening point of the billet sample was measured on a 3 mm disk sample cut from the billet.
The water that should remove the heat is no longer there and this results in the furnace metal reaches softening point and, with the internal pressure of the boiler, can cause lethal results.
Besides, characteristics of rubberized binder were evaluated based on penetration test, ring and ball softening point test, and viscosity test (Brookfield viscometer).
As shown in table 4, E-140 has a Vicat softening point of 64[degrees]C, which corresponds to the onset of a second step change in slope of the elastic modulus.
Most resin suppliers categorize products according to softening point from 100[degrees]C to 140[degrees]C.
However, oil-based printing filaments are still used because they have a higher softening point and make more flexible models that will bend before they break.