soil colloid

soil colloid

[¦sȯil ¦kä‚lȯid]
(geology)
Colloidal complex of soils composed principally of clay and humus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phosphate is known to adsorb specifically onto soil colloid by ligand exchange, which increases negative charge.
A fourth important soil colloid type is the organic soil colloids, or humus.
However, a greater lowering of hydraulic conductivity in the As-affected soils with time of flow allowed enhanced contact between the soil colloid fraction and the passing As solution, leading to increased sorption-diffusion by the soil colloids.
The specific adsorption of phosphate mainly occurred on the Fe/A1 oxides; hence, the highest content of free Fe/Al oxides, in the Oxisol from Yunnan, resulted in the greatest specific adsorption of phosphate on the soil and caused the maximum decrease in zeta potential of the soil colloid.
Ion exchange takes place when one of the ions in the soil solution replaces one of the ions on the soil colloid.
Adherence ability of herbicide in soil depends on kind of soil colloid and its amount, ionic properties of herbicide and soil moisture content (Rastgar, 2000).
Exchange between a cation in solution and one adsorbed on a soil colloid.
In terrestrial ecosystems, sorption-desorption reactions on soil colloid surfaces control the concentration of heavy metal in soil solution, and hence may affect their bioavailability, leaching, and toxicity (Backes et al.
However, exchangeable cation ratios are 'peripheral' to arguments relating to structural stability, because structural stability, insofar as it is affected by the dispersion or coagulation of the soil colloid, depends on the properties of the electrical double layer and thus on the equilibrium solution ratios and concentrations (cf.
In the soil DNA molecules adsorb to soil colloids and minerals that prevent its enzymatic degradation particularly from DNases (Romanowski et al.