soil formation


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Related to soil formation: Soil horizons

soil formation

[′sȯil ‚fȯr·mā·shən]
(geology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Naghavi [11] studied the reasons of soil formation and change in pistachio cultivation of Rafsanjan County.
Until recently, this exercise was largely restricted to evaluating soil formation rates in deposits (e.g.
Logically, the large tropical area occupied by savannahs shows great variability in soil formation factors.
Our results suggest that soil formation in the study area essentially proceeds through transfers and matter additions.
For modeling purposes, the process of soil formation in addition to assessing potential climate It is necessary to consider the characteristics of source rocks, especially their granulometric content and soil formation period (soil age).
The transformation sequence of the mottles in the plinthite, as soil formation progresses downward in the profile, appears to be red (2.5YR, as found at depth), to red with a thin brown rind, to reddish yellow (5YR), to strong brown (7.5YR and even 10YR) near the top of the B-horizon (Fig.
Yet there are also other types of soils, depending on the factors involved in their soil formation.
van Breeman N, Buurman P (2002) 'Soil formation.' 2nd edn.(Kluwer: New York)
Jenny H (1941) 'Factors of soil formation.' (McGraw-Hill: New York, NY)
Biodiversity is important in soil formation and fertility maintenance.
Both the developed and developing countries are guilty of allowing this tragic event to occur, although soil loss in developing nations is worse because continuous land use limits new soil formation.
Soil of farmlands used for growing crops are being carried away by water and wind erosion at rates between 10 and 40 times the rates of soil formation and between 500 and 10,000 times soil erosion rates on forested land.