Soil Profile


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soil profile

[¦sȯil ¦prō‚fīl]
(geology)
A vertical section of a soil, showing horizons and parent material.

Soil Profile

 

a vertical cross section of soil extending from the surface to the parent material and consisting of genetically related horizons and subhorizons created during soil formation. A soil profile may range in thickness from several dozen centimeters to several meters. Soil profiles are divided into natural profiles and those that have been altered by man’s activity (cultivation, reclamation, improvement).

The variations in the structure of the soil profile and in the composition and properties of its horizons serve as the basis for classifying soils. The profile of each soil group, subgroup, genus, and species has a distinct structure that reflects the processes taking place in the soil. Therefore, an analysis of the soil profile (by comparing the composition and properties of the horizons) is the principal means of studying the genesis and fertility of soils, working out methods for improving them, and compiling soil maps.

soil profile

The vertical section of a soil, 1, showing the nature and sequence of the various layers, as developed by deposition or weathering, or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in microbial communities were predominantly driven by their location within the soil profile, and not the amendment type or method of placement.
Vertically magnesium content remained same in any of the soil profile except for Mela (30ft) and Chanda (30 and 50ft), however magnesium horizontal distribution was different at Nashpa (70ft), Chanda and Mela (30 and 50ft) in the contaminated soil profile.
Komaarek, "Cadmium isotope fractionation within the soil profile complicates source identification in relation to Pb-Zn mining and smelting processes," Chemical Geology, vol.
However, Hu, Shao Han, Reicherdt, and Tan (2010) indicated that while most of the efforts applied to soil moisture temporal stability analysis have been focusing on the soil surface layer, few studies have evaluated the soil profile given the difficulty of monitoring soil moisture in depths and at various points in space.
Unlike the area under agriculture (ATA), in which the Na was positively correlated with OM, CEC, K and EC in the superficial layers of the soil profile, in the area thinned in savanna system (ASV), this element showed negative correlation with the others, indicating a situation of antagonism with greater availability in the lower layers, which can be explained by the displacement of exchangeable Na to the soil solution through exchange reactions promoted by the higher concentration of [Mg.sup.2+] and [K.sup.+] in the superficial layers.
The NO3-N is highly mobile in soil and can easily leach down the soil profile (Sahrawat, 1982).
The goal is to place the sensor in a location that has the soil profile and characteristics that represents an "average" of the entire block.
Having relation 15, required depth for removing soluble salts from soil profile with a given thickness and a given final salinity of saturated soil extract is computed as follows:
The greatest SAR values were generally at a depth of 24 to 36 inches at all sites (data not shown), suggesting that salts were generally leaching from the root zone deeper into the soil profile. SAR values increased at site 4 following the change in the quality of the applied water.
This region of the soil profile, which typically has not been sampled by other researchers investigating carbon sequestration levels, is below the tillage zone and is therefore more stable over time.