solar burst

solar burst

[′sō·lər ′bərst]
(astrophysics)
A sudden increase in the radio-frequency energy radiated by the sun, generally associated with visible solar flares.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Determination of the start and end time for selected days of high solar activity was chosen from 22.30 on the day when the solar burst started, and up to 23.30.
That pulse probably was associated with the Bastille Day solar burst, a torrent of charged particles that began to spill off the surface of the sun on July 14, 2000.
Researchers have previously said the solar burst could be strong enough to affect civil aviation navigation systems but to a lesser degree than the GPS network, which uses a different atellite system.
The solar bursts would have enveloped Earth in magnetic fireworks matching the largest magnetic storm ever reported on Earth, the so-called Carrington event of 1859.
The MWA will explore the so-called "cosmic dawn", when the first stars and galaxies formed in the early universe, as well as "space weather" including solar bursts. It consists of 2,048 dipole antennae, arranged into 128 "tile" clusters, about 100 kilometres (60 miles) west of Meekathara in the deep radio silence of Australia's remote red-sand desert.
Solar bursts begin with a flare that sends high-energy electrons into the atmosphere.