solar power satellite


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solar power satellite

[‚sō·lər ‚pau̇·ər ′sad·əl‚īt]
(engineering)
A proposed collector of solar energy that would be placed in geostationary orbit where sunlight striking the satellite would be converted to electricity and then to microwaves, which would be beamed to earth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Early designs for the Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large PHased Array, or SPS-ALPHA -- which are being developed by Artemis Innovation Management Solutions -- rely on lightweight mirrors and a shape that mimics that of a flower to efficiently collect the sun's energy.
John Mankins, who runs California based firm Artemis Innovation Management Solutions, said the SPS-ALPHA, or Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large PHased Array, could become a reality one day.
An attempt has been made to place the solar power satellite in proper perspective within the power engineering community On the basis of comparison of various ideas and technologies one may club the concepts with the recent technologies for the future implementation of the satellite solar power system to generate base load electrical power.
Alden [6] predicted the electromagnetic compatibility of rectenna for solar power satellite. Its prediction requires model for the four categories of rectenna array, namely reflections of the powering wave, radiations of harmonics, of inter modulation products and of spurious frequency components.
Silicon technologies dominate the panel market today, but Sivaram sees greater dynamic potential in perovskite, organic and quantum dot solar cells, and possibly orbital solar power satellites. Breakthroughs in those areas might lower costs and increase solar potency, making the calculus more favourable to green energy.
While some might object that renewable power could never provide for the kind of high tech society Gorz contemplates, such criticisms overlook the very real possibility of such innovations as solar power satellites. (That Gorz may have been aware of such proposals is indicated by his review of Alvin Toffler's The Third Wave in Paths to Paradise; On the Liberation from Work.
(24.) Gao Ji, Hou Zinbin, and Wang Li, "Solar Power Satellites Research in China," Online Journal of Space Communication 16 (Winter 2010), http://spacejournal.ohio.edu/issue16/ji.html.
Ultimately, tens of billions of dollars would be needed to develop and deploy a sufficiently low-cost fleet of reusable, earth-to-orbit vehicles to launch full-scale commercial solar power satellites, the study group estimated.
In a few decades, we will have solar power satellites and fusion, both of which can provide thousands of times more power than we use now.
The huge structures needed to build solar power satellites would make construction difficult and expensive--a microwave transmitting antenna alone would be around 1km in diameter.
If this is the company Arnold is keeping, maybe he should instead become the Predator and CEO of Termatron, a new electric utility, using nuclear fission and solar power satellites as new power sources to generate and beam electricity to earth.
These include hydrogen, third-generation fission plants, solar power satellites, renewable energy sources, and the orbital satellite energy grid for world distribution.