solar prominence


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Related to solar prominence: coronal mass ejection

solar prominence

[′sō·lər ′präm·ə·nəns]
(astronomy)
Sheets of luminous gas emanating from the sun's surface; they appear dark against the sun's disk but bright against the dark sky, and occur only in regions of horizontal magnetic fields.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Solar prominences follow the sun's magnetic field and can break off to form a coronal mass ejection (CME).
Quiescent solar prominences and filaments are those features in solar atmosphere which show material flows and oscillations.
In a solar prominence, the sun is ejecting massive amounts of plasma and radiation into deep space.
A simple illustration of these issues can be focused on the understanding of solar prominences. Such objects appear as sheet-like structures in images captured by NASA's SOHO satellite (see Figure 2).
As Littmann, Willcox, and Espenak note in their book, "The first sure report of solar prominences came from Julius Firmicus Maternus in Sicily, who noticed them during the annular eclipse of July 17, 334."
According to Turner and colleagues, the magnetic atmospheres are similar to what takes place on the surface of our sun, where moving magnetic field lines spur tremendous solar prominences to flare up in big loops.
The unusual solar prominences include a giant disc that rotates for several hours, feathery streamers as long as fifty Earths, a super-heated jet striking the top of a prominence and twisted ribbons flowing in opposite directions at a million kilometers per hour.
The Sun had a number of small spots that we were able to show the visitors using the refractor and throughout the day there were solar prominences that the Coronado was able to pick up.
That allows you to see magnificent solar prominences, which
It concludes by showing how spheromak ideas are closely related to the physics of solar prominences and interplanetary magnetic clouds.
Tumultuous conditions sculpt the plasma at the sun's surface into huge arches of fluid flame known as solar prominences. In the intensely hot outer atmosphere, or corona, collisions of huge blobs of plasma fuel enormous jets of energy called solar flares, which often fire far into space.
These were called solar prominences and, like solar flares (see 1859), were evidence of violent activity on the Sun.