solar tide

solar tide

[′sō·lər ′tīd]
(oceanography)
The tide caused solely by the tide-producing forces of the sun.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main solar tide has a period, or repeat time, of 12 hours.
The other important lunar constituent, with a period of 12.7 hours, is even closer to resonance and overtakes the 12-hour solar tide in importance.
Now we also see that tides - the daily lunar and solar tides - very strongly modulate tremors," he added.
Berkeley's Jeanloz notes that the rotation rate of the entire Earth is slowing as a result of the friction caused by lunar and solar tides. The deceleration of the inner core, however, may lag behind that of the rest of the planet because the inner core is separated from the mantle and crust by the fluid outer core.
In your commendably anti-panic May cover story on planetary alignments and solar tides, Donald Olson and Thomas Lytle calculate the tides induced on the Sun by the planets using the approximation that the planets are exactly on the ecliptic.
Also, big quakes have never happened at times of big solar tides. Nevertheless, generalized fear was widespread, with the media happily fanning the flames of panic.
Saturn and Mars have a much smaller influence than the Earth-Moon system, while the three outer planets have almost no effect on solar tides.

Full browser ?