soldering iron


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soldering iron

a hand tool consisting of a handle fixed to a copper tip that is heated, electrically or in a flame, and used to melt and apply solder
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Soldering Iron

 

(soldering copper), a soldering tool used to heat the parts being joined, melt the solder, and introduce the liquid solder into the gap. The working part of a soldering iron is usually made of copper to maximize heat conductivity. The tip is tapered at an angle of 30° to 40°, and the working edge is rounded. The heating temperature of a soldering iron should stay below 400°C to prevent the tip from dissolving into the liquid solder. The shape, size, and weight of a soldering iron are dictated by the type of joint being soldered and by the configuration and mass of the object. The weight can range from 0.1 kg in irons used to solder electronic components to 5 kg in irons used to solder large objects.

Soldering irons are divided into three groups according to the method of heating: those with no permanent heating, those heated continuously by a flame, and those with electric heating. Household electric soldering irons are classified by the type of heating (continuous, intermittent, forced, and pulsed), the kind of soldering stick, the power rating (from 10 to 250 watts), and the time required for heating to 280°C. Ultrasonic soldering irons are special-purpose irons that use the vibrations of the heated stick to break down the oxide film on the surface of the metal being soldered while the metal is under a layer of molten solder. The principal advantage of ultrasonic soldering irons is that they allow soldering without fluxes; the irons are used chiefly to solder aluminum with solders that have low melting points.

V. P. FROLOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

soldering iron

[′säd·ə·riŋ ‚ī·ərn]
(engineering)
A rod of copper with a handle on one end and pointed or wedge-shaped at the other end, and used for applying heat in soldering.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

soldering iron

A tool for joining metals with solder; has a wedge-shaped metal bit, usually of copper, which is heated.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: You can use a file or dremel to modify soldering iron or wood burning tips, or you can buy the pre-made tip set from OTDefense, specifically designed for stippling polymer.
I met Mrs Wraith coming into the passage to see what was the noise and I struck her with the iron part of the soldering iron. I then went into the kitchen and got the poker and struck them each two or three blows.
Never touch melted solder or the tip/element of a soldering iron until they are completely cool.
About the only thing you'll need for do-it-yourself stippling is a soldering iron. A simple 25-watt iron--available at any hardware or home improvement store for $30 or less--will do everything you need.
To understand the mechanisms involved with the degradation of the soldering iron tips, we first have to understand the composition of the soldering iron tips.
TIP: Add some sparkle by using the soldering iron to apply the hot fix gems to the cushion.
Place the wire on the circuit board and hold it in place with the tip of the soldering iron. Add solder.
Group C was three specimens prepared using a soldering iron with a blade tip and wicking braid.
I even use a soldering iron to create unusual effects."
Here's what you will do: apply rubber strips to your urn, and then use a soldering iron to engrave a design in the rubber.
The women were also "disciplined," according to the Los Angeles Times, by being forced to drink detergent, and one was tortured with a soldering iron. In 1971, he was sentenced to one to 10 years in prison for these crimes.
If the user chooses to use a soldering iron it should be of the controlled temperature variety and used to proximally heat the connection.