solenoid


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Related to solenoid: Solenoid valve

solenoid

(sō`lənoid'), device made of a long wire that has been wound many times into a tightly packed coil; it has the shape of a long cylinder. If current is sent through a solenoid made of insulated wire and having a length much greater than its diameter, a uniform magnetic field will be created inside the solenoid. This field can be intensified by inserting a ferromagnetic core into the solenoid. See electromagnetelectromagnet,
device in which magnetism is produced by an electric current. Any electric current produces a magnetic field, but the field near an ordinary straight conductor is rarely strong enough to be of practical use.
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; magnetismmagnetism,
force of attraction or repulsion between various substances, especially those made of iron and certain other metals; ultimately it is due to the motion of electric charges.
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Solenoid

 

an electrically energized coil that is usually in the form of an insulated wire wound on a cylindrical surface. If the length of the coil is substantially longer than the diameter, the magnetic field in the middle of the coil is uniform and is directed parallel to the axis of the coil. The field strength in this central part is proportional to the current and (approximately) to the number of turns. The external magnetic field of a solenoid is similar to the field of a bar magnet (see Figure 1, p. 256). When the coil has an iron core, the solenoid constitutes an electromagnet.

Figure 1. Lines of force of the magnetic field of a solenoid

solenoid

[′säl·ə‚nȯid]
(electromagnetism)
Also known as electric solenoid.
An electrically energized coil of insulated wire which produces a magnetic field within the coil.
In particular, a coil that surrounds a movable iron core which is pulled to a central position with respect to the coil when the coil is energized by sending current through it.
(meteorology)

solenoid

1. a coil of wire, usually cylindrical, in which a magnetic field is set up by passing a current through it
2. a coil of wire, partially surrounding an iron core, that is made to move inside the coil by the magnetic field set up by a current: used to convert electrical to mechanical energy, as in the operation of a switch
3. such a device used as a relay, as in a motor vehicle for connecting the battery directly to the starter motor when activated by the ignition switch

solenoid

A mechanical switch that is activated by a magnetic coil. It is used to open and close an electric circuit, open or close a valve in a fluid pipe or cause some mechanical action to be triggered.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once the seat belts are properly inserted this will send the signals to the relay board and the shut off solenoid valve which is placed in between the flow of the fuel supply.
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At the centre of a long solenoid, the magnetic field is [32]:
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o]) of the appropriate outlet solenoid valve compressed air will deflate from muscle (air flow rate [Q.
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UCN with energies exceeding the solenoid magnetic barrier will penetrate the barrier and disappear.
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Trombetta engineers set out with a goal to compensate for the factors that would normally weaken solenoid performance in real-world applications and drive up installed cost.
Artificial muscles weigh about 1/50 of a solenoid that produces a similar amount of energy," he says, "and about 1/30 the weight of an electric motor.