solid-state maser

solid-state maser

[′säl·əd ¦stāt ′mā·zər]
(physics)
A maser in which a semiconductor material produces the coherent output beam; two input waves are required: one wave, called the pumping source, induces upward energy transitions in the active material, and the second wave, of lower frequency, causes downward transitions and undergoes amplification as it absorbs photons from the active material.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The breakthrough does indeed seem significant, because the scientists were able to demonstrate a solid-state maser that operated at room temperature, working in air and with no applied magnetic field.
Previously, getting results from the maser was a tough job, says Dr Mark Oxborrow, co-author of the NPL study on the solid-state maser. "To get the maser to work it had to sit in the bottom of a big refrigerator just to get it down to close to absolute zero.
Scovil of Bell Labs published a paper entitled "The Three-level Solid-state Maser," which opened up an entirely new horizon of applications.
At that time, there was much research ongoing in solid-state masers. The maser, an acronym for Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation, was invented in 1953 as a means of amplifying radio waves into a coherent electromagnetic signal.
In 1957, he joined McGill University, Montreal as an NRC post doctorate fellow and worked on solid-state masers. Prior to that, he was an associate professor of applied physics at Allahabad University.

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