soliloquy

(redirected from soliloquies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

soliloquy,

the speech by a character in a literary composition, usually a play, delivered while the speaker is either alone addressing the audience directly or the other actors are silent. It is most commonly used to reveal the innermost concerns or thoughts of the speaker, thus pointing up the drama of internal conflict, as in Richard III's opening speech, "Now is the winter of our discontent." The form was quite popular in Elizabethan drama, notably in the plays of Shakespeare. The soliloquy may also act simply as a vehicle for information about absent characters or events occurring at some other time or place. In the modern theater the soliloquy has tended to disappear completely, although experimentations in its use were attempted by such playwrights as Eugene O'Neill, who sought through the soliloquy to achieve a greater psychological realism. See monologuemonologue,
an extended speech by one person only. Strindberg's one-act play The Stronger, spoken entirely by one person, is an extreme example of monologue. Soliloquy is synonymous, but usually refers to a character in a play talking or thinking aloud to himself, giving
..... Click the link for more information.
.

soliloquy

1. the act of speaking alone or to oneself, esp as a theatrical device
2. a speech in a play that is spoken in soliloquy
References in periodicals archive ?
Millicent Bell when she cites the most famous of Shakespeares soliloquies projects its complexities as the authors own:
In late Renaissance drama soliloquies by characters engaged in the
As The Dream proceeds through its seven sections, visual divisions (including section breaks and line breaks between speakers) effectively separate the religious rites and liturgy quoted in the poem from the more seemingly secular soliloquies, making it easy to excerpt and favor certain passages--as readers like General Gordon evidently did.
Characters often begin soliloquies alone (or at least so consumed in thought they believe they are alone), but other characters may overhear the soliloquies and join in the conversation.
Self-management is the halhnark of Hamlet's soliloquies.
Woven into these soliloquies is contemporary thought and action.
First, a pair of chapters provides a chronological account of soliloquies in European drama from antiquity to the early seventeenth century.
GEORGE SANTAYANA * SOLILOQUIES IN ENGLAND AND LATER SOLILOQUIES.
He loved poetry, most of all Shakespeare, and knew many soliloquies by heart.
David Threlfall's lago is dangerously multi-dimensional rather than merely malevolent: he sounds like just one of the guys with Roderigo and the soldiers, genuinely approving and admiring with Desdemona, as subtle as a snake with Othello, and cold-blooded and treacherous in his asides and soliloquies.
This vigorously argued account of the history of soliloquies moves from the classical past to the present day.