soliloquy

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soliloquy,

the speech by a character in a literary composition, usually a play, delivered while the speaker is either alone addressing the audience directly or the other actors are silent. It is most commonly used to reveal the innermost concerns or thoughts of the speaker, thus pointing up the drama of internal conflict, as in Richard III's opening speech, "Now is the winter of our discontent." The form was quite popular in Elizabethan drama, notably in the plays of Shakespeare. The soliloquy may also act simply as a vehicle for information about absent characters or events occurring at some other time or place. In the modern theater the soliloquy has tended to disappear completely, although experimentations in its use were attempted by such playwrights as Eugene O'Neill, who sought through the soliloquy to achieve a greater psychological realism. See monologuemonologue,
an extended speech by one person only. Strindberg's one-act play The Stronger, spoken entirely by one person, is an extreme example of monologue. Soliloquy is synonymous, but usually refers to a character in a play talking or thinking aloud to himself, giving
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soliloquy

1. the act of speaking alone or to oneself, esp as a theatrical device
2. a speech in a play that is spoken in soliloquy
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
When Hamlet first soliloquizes on death he sees it as a pristine negation" an undiscovered country".
I refer here to that oft-quoted passage at the end of Richard II, where the deposed king soliloquizes on his unhappy circumstances, referring to himself explicitly as a 'jack':
Whimsical conceits: "Liddell and Scott," "The Letter's Triumph," "Inscriptions for a Peal of Eight Bells," "One Ralph Blossom Soliloquizes"
and de Noailles--in "Eurydice" the dead Beloved is herself given a voice and perspective, whereas in "Tu vis, je bois l'azur" the gender roles are reversed, and the female poet soliloquizes about her silent male Beloved's impending and inevitable death.
Basquiat likewise soliloquizes the problem, penetrating the heart of whiteness to the bone, argues hooks, kneeling when necessary before the gallery masters and then making canvas yield the broken black aorta in the private spaces of his work (hooks, 343).
Center stage, spotlighted, he soliloquizes about the nobility of his law enforcement in the name of justice and the King, even as he strips off his magistrate's robe and wig and dons his disguise, an extravagant jester's cap and bells.
It is his avocation, rather than his vocation, that takes center stage, as he soliloquizes over his mystical garden.
And this it was, this same unaccountable, cunning life-principle in him; this it was, that kept him a great part of the time soliloquizing; but only like an unreasoning wheel, which also hummingly soliloquizes; or rather, his body was a sentry-box and this soliloquizer on guard there, and talking all the time to keep himself awake.
He disguises himself as a peasant, sits down in front of a bordello run by a madam named Mabile, and soliloquizes loudly on the five pounds he has made by selling grain and livestock, and on the fact that he grieves for a long-lost niece named (of all things) Mabile, on whom he would settle his fortune.
What are we to imagine when we are told that Richard soliloquizes on a London street?
Stubborn and unrepentant, he soliloquizes about how he surely will live a long life and fantasizes about joining the Chinese figures in a kind of art-bestowed immortality.
Immediately before Anne's speech, Wendoll soliloquizes about how he has grown in Frankford's affections.