soliloquy

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soliloquy,

the speech by a character in a literary composition, usually a play, delivered while the speaker is either alone addressing the audience directly or the other actors are silent. It is most commonly used to reveal the innermost concerns or thoughts of the speaker, thus pointing up the drama of internal conflict, as in Richard III's opening speech, "Now is the winter of our discontent." The form was quite popular in Elizabethan drama, notably in the plays of Shakespeare. The soliloquy may also act simply as a vehicle for information about absent characters or events occurring at some other time or place. In the modern theater the soliloquy has tended to disappear completely, although experimentations in its use were attempted by such playwrights as Eugene O'Neill, who sought through the soliloquy to achieve a greater psychological realism. See monologuemonologue,
an extended speech by one person only. Strindberg's one-act play The Stronger, spoken entirely by one person, is an extreme example of monologue. Soliloquy is synonymous, but usually refers to a character in a play talking or thinking aloud to himself, giving
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soliloquy

1. the act of speaking alone or to oneself, esp as a theatrical device
2. a speech in a play that is spoken in soliloquy
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, Farrison states that "in act 3, scene 5, he tried to make Melinda soliloquize about sleep somewhat as Macbeth talked about it" (303-4).
Fanny also soliloquizes out in nature, where she is often abandoned by others to sit alone with her thoughts.
While they both roam the remembrances of their youths, it seems as if someone soliloquizes. One becomes familiar with their mothers, who grew up in an orphanage and, although not relatives, were as close as sisters, their sons consequently related to each other as cousins.
Before Hamlet visits his mother, the play introduces a scene in which Claudius soliloquizes his great guilt and struggles with his nature: "O!
He cannot veer from his quest to annihilate the white whale; as he soliloquizes after his quarterdeck oration, not even the gods can bend him: "Come and see if ye can swerve me.
"My argument is love," soliloquizes Britton's imprisoned Palamon, nephew to Theban king Creon and friend-turned-rival to his newly banished cousin, Arcite (Will Keen).
So when Hamlet soliloquizes, "To be or not to be," he is talking about being and nothingness, but he is also enacting the paralysis of will characteristic of alienation.
"Well, we are women, aren't we?" soliloquizes the fierce heroine of Eleanor Wilner's new translation of Medea, her words resonating through 25 centuries into today's headlines.
Helisenne exhorts and soliloquizes, confirming what Gabriele Schwab calls a "nonsymbolic self-state," a literary condition crafted by composite images of early, affective states of consciousness that seem to precede language and object-relations.(2) The letters are cliches, reminiscent of syndicated dialogues found in Dear Abby columns, but they also constitute, in their very superficiality, expression of a vital alterity.
Edmund again soliloquizes, this time on the EXCELLENT FOPPERY (3) of those who link behaviour with planetary influence.