solitary

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solitary

1. (of animals) not living in organized colonies or large groups
2. (of flowers) growing singly
3. Informal short for solitary confinement
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"I love you" obliterates the difference, the uniqueness of the desire it sets out to capture, and affirms the difference it sets out to efface, the gap between I and you, which necessarily invests the performance with a certain solitariness.
In the varied worlds of Cervantes, solitariness is found to be the most dangerous condition, solipsism the worst sin, as the source of destructive fantasies."(22) Friendship is the way of escape from solipsism and despair.
Using a statistical test, one would ask whether aposematism is more likely to evolve in solitary than in gregarious species, that is, if the state solitariness somehow influences the evolution of aposematism.
Because the young wife in Li Po's poem is unpracticed in grief, she feels all the more sharply what are in fact all the traditional signs of her desertion and solitariness: the moss, the paired butterflies, and the autumn leaves falling in wind.
He worked summers on fishing boats as a cook, relishing the solitariness of the job.
The first is one you are very likely not to think of: although easy home accessibility is a boon, it may encourage a solitude, a solitariness that could be undesirable.
In this joyously vulgar register, Mathers is closest to his friend, supporter and contemporary, the playwright lack Hibberd, analyst of solitariness and celebrity.
Rather, privacy is seen as more connected to confidential conversation than solitariness, as less available in domestic space than corporate, and as a sometime threat to public discipline rather than a universally valued state.
Israel, who shot a bullet on innocence and mercy, has chosen with this murder in the open sea, solitariness against the whole world.
Hopper, The Crisis of Faith (Nashville: Abingdon-Cokesbury Press, 1944): "The 'midnight hour' in which 'all men must unmask' is an hour of impotence, solitariness, confusion of Spirit--crisis" (27): [citing Matthew Arnold] "Wandering between two worlds, one dead,/The other powerless to be born./With nowhere yet to rest my head,/Like these, on earth I wait forlorn" (34); [citing Yeats] "Things fall apart; the center cannot hold;/Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world;/.../The best lack ail conviction, while the worst/Are full of passionate intensity" (44); "The critic of culture ...
Musical performance brings the protagonist to the brink of transcending the solitariness of experience.
(3) Connectedness and community are dwelled on in place of isolation, solitariness, marginality, and their attendant anxieties, fears, and horrors.