solstices


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solstices

(sol -stiss-iz)
1. (solstitial points) the two points that lie on the ecliptic midway between the vernal and autumnal equinoxes and at which the Sun, in its apparent annual motion, is at its greatest angular distance (23½°) north or south of the celestial equator.
2. The times at which the Sun reaches these points, on about June 21 and Dec. 22; the hours of daylight or of darkness are then at a maximum.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
But we're nearly on our way back; today is the shortest day of the year, also known as the Winter Solstice, when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Capricorn, and at its lowest point in the sky if you are in the Northern Hemisphere.
THOUSANDS of people celebrating the summer solstice were treated to a perfect sunrise at Stonehenge.
These solstices happen because the Earth (https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/nasa-satellites-ready-when-stars-and-planets-align) reaches the point in its orbit where it is most drastically pointed away from the sun.
While it's widely believed the solstice, the point at which the Northern hemisphere is most inclined towards the sun, always falls on June 21 (what we've come to think of as Midsummer's Day) it can actually happen any time between June 20 and 22 (although June 22 solstices are so rare that the last one happened in 1975 and it won't occur again until 2203).
Recent pagan celebrations at the site began in the 20th century More than a million people flock to Stonehenge every year, with thousands attending ceremonies to mark the solstices in summer and winter.
The most famous site is Stonehenge, where thousands flock every year to see the annual pagan rituals performed around the iconic stones, as their positioning is said to be aligned with the sunrises of the two annual solstices.
London: Gardens of the famed Taj Mahal, one of the seven wonders of the world, align perfectly with the rising and setting sun during the summer and winter solstices, according to new research.
However, at the time of the Solstices, both the Summer Solstice around the July 22 and the December Winter Solstice, the noontime height of the Sun in the sky appears constant for a few days before and after the Solstice.
There are two solstices each year when the sun appears to reach its most northerly or southerly point in the sky before "stopping" and changing direction.
Seasonal solstices and equinoxes are more of a ho-hum almanac note, though of course they also correspond to physical events.
Ray has been leading the readings, originally started on Thanksgiving in the early 1990s by Fran Rosenthal, Mount Pisgah's education manager, on the summer and winter solstices for the past decade.
Chinese determinations of the dates of the solstices and the length of the year continued to improve.