somatic

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Related to somatic pain: Neuropathic pain

somatic

1. of or relating to the soma
2. of or relating to an animal body or body wall as distinct from the viscera, limbs, and head
3. of or relating to the human body as distinct from the mind
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These blocks only relieve somatic pain whereas our study targeted the visceral pain by using SHP block.
The present study included 33 female patients suffering from chronic somatic pain for assessment of autonomic reactivity and compared with age and sex, matched 22 control subjects.
Course II, Stress and Pain Management: Regenerative Medicine for Body and Mind will review personalized and regenerative medicine strategies for stress and somatic pain syndromes.
Nociceptive pain can be subdivided further into somatic pain or visceral pain.
Patients can suffer from somatic pain, neuropathic pain, visceral pain or complex mixed pain.
Fairhurst et al., "A comparison of visceral and somatic pain processing in the human brainstem using functional magnetic resonance imaging," Journal of Neuroscience, vol.
The two different types of nociceptive pain are somatic pain (originating from the musculoskeletal system) and visceral pain (originating from the internal organs of the body).
Studies have concluded that women experiencing domestic violence are prone to suffer from anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, suicide, somatic pain syndromes, phobias and panic disorder.
'Anyone with a history of substance abuse should be treated with opiates for bad somatic pain only with extreme caution.
Somatic pain results from noxious stimulation neural structures while neuropathic pain is caused by a structural abnormality in the nervous system.
TAP blocks eliminate somatic pain relating to the surgical incision but do not treat visceral pain.
Somatic pain is typically well localised and is felt in the superficial cutaneous or deeper musculoskeletal system.