postcentral gyrus

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postcentral gyrus

[pōst′sen·trəl ′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
The cerebral convolution that lies immediately posterior to the central sulcus and extends from the longitudinal fissure above the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Friedman, "Projection pattern of functional components of thalamic ventrobasal complex on monkey somatosensory cortex," Journal of Neurophysiology, vol.
Holden et al., "Functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome reflect reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex," Brain, vol.
Lenz et al., "Resting BOLD fluctuations in the primary somatosensory cortex correlate with tactile acuity," Cortex, vol.
In this study, significantly increased activation in posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), primary somatosensory cortex (SI), primary motor cortex (MI), and cingulate motor area (CMA) and decreased activation in parahippocampal gyrus during finger movements were found.
These devices work by implanting arrays of electrodes in the somatosensory cortex and areas of the brain that control movement.
Before oxaliplatin treatment, 10[degrees]C evoked activation in brain areas involved with sensation, such as primary somatosensory cortex, and areas involved with movement, such as areas PE/PG of parietal cortex.
Hanganu-Opatz, "Oscillatory entrainment of primary somatosensory cortex encodes visual control of tactile processing," The Journal of Neuroscience, vol.
Current direction specificity of continuous theta-burst stimulation in modulating human motor cortex excitability when applied to somatosensory cortex. Neuroreport 2012; 23:927-931.
One, for example, was the sequential activation during motor tasks of the premotor cortex, then the primary somatosensory cortex, then the primary motor cortex in healthy brains.
Itsuggeststhat a relevant part of projections from the occipital cortex passes through the thalamus to be conveyed to the somatosensory cortex. Interestingly, in this study, the lateral geniculate nucleus was intact, showing that it is not an obligatory relay for visuosomatosensory connections.
Brief painful stimuli induce GBA in somatosensory cortices [10,46], probably reflecting local sensory processing in the somatosensory cortex [47].
The authors found that when the participants thought about being rejected, areas of the brain that support the sensory components of physical pain (the secondary somatosensory cortex and the dorsal posterior insula) became active.