postcentral gyrus

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postcentral gyrus

[pōst′sen·trəl ′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
The cerebral convolution that lies immediately posterior to the central sulcus and extends from the longitudinal fissure above the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus.
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30 Hz theta-burst stimulation over primary somatosensory cortex modulates corticospinal output to the hand.
This gave them an unprecedented insight at great spatial resolution into the cortical organization of primary motor and somatosensory cortex of each patient.
A mass tissue containing the primary somatosensory cortex was then cut, separated from the brain, affixed with cyanoacrylate, and placed in a cutting chamber.
For Thomson, the success proved that the adult rat's brain was plastic enough to reroute new sources of information to the somatosensory cortex.
Stavrinou ML, Della Penna S, Pizzella V, Torquati K, Cianflone F, Franciotti R, Bezerianos A, Romani GL, Rossini PM (2007) Temporal dynamics of plastic changes in human primary somatosensory cortex after finger webbing.
They concluded that early activation of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) was not sufficient to warrant conscious stimulus perception.
Experts claim that we are using our fingertips and thumbs hour after hour, day after day and they are concerned that intense phone use may be bad for human health, altering the shape of the somatosensory cortex leading to pain, spasms and movement disorders such as dystonia.
It has been known for some time that the hand is amazingly over-represented in the somatosensory cortex (Kaas et al.
The two hemispheres of the somatosensory cortex receive information almost exclusively from the opposite side; ie, touch information from the left hand will be transmitted to the right somatosensory cortex.
The primary somatosensory cortex lies in the posterior bank of the rolandic fissure representing Brodmann's area 3b in the parietal lobe.
The researchers found that, compared with the women who didn't consume the probiotic yogurt, those who did showed a decrease in activity in both the insula - which processes and integrates internal body sensations, like those form the gut - and the somatosensory cortex during the emotional reactivity task.
When subjects blinked, the researchers detected a momentary stand-down within the brain's visual cortex and somatosensory cortex - both involved with processing visual stimuli - and in areas that govern attention.