somnambulism


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Related to somnambulism: night terrors

somnambulism

a condition that is characterized by walking while asleep or in a hypnotic trance
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Somnambulism

 

a pathological state that is manifested in unconscious, outwardly well-ordered, and at times absurd or dangerous actions performed while sleeping and consequently not remembered. Somnambulism may be induced artificially through hypnotism, which indicates the similarity between the pathophysiological mechanisms of somnambulism and hypnosis.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

somnambulism

[säm′näm·byə‚liz·əm]
(physiology)
Sleepwalking.
The performance of any fairly complex act while in a sleeplike state or trance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Somnambulism: clinical aspects and pathophysiological hypotheses.
To those (we quote again from our author) who refuse to believe even in the first fundamental fact, of the production of the slate commonly termed the Mesmeric somnambulism, by the process of the magnetic manipulation--a state of extraordinary sleep-waking, during which a peculiar relation, of either nervous or mental influence and connexion, exists between the active and the passive parties to the process--to these we have nothing to say.
In the third chapter, "Charles Brockden Brown and the Psychological Gothic," Weinstock continues to enlist today's popular culture (here, Scooby Doo and X-Files) to aid us in understanding the range and the reach of Brown's Gothicism, as Brown--through "Somnambulism," Ormond and Edgar Huntly--explores the haunted mind and its misperceptions.
The story begins shortly after the composer's death when his first famous mentor, the singer Johann Michael Vogl, wrote in an 1831 letter addressed to Albert Stadler, a friend from Schubert's youth, that Schubert's music "comes into existence during a state of clairvoyance or somnambulism" (quoted in Clark.
Alcott's audience will read breathlessly as they follow Jackson and James into their teenage years and then into adulthood, along with their hallucinatory tendencies, somnambulism, and increasingly strange but realistic night terrors.
Here, I want to reveal how Brown uses Erasmus Darwin's articulations of the trance-like states of reverie, erotomania, and somnambulism to help him construct an American masculinity that endorses Enlightenment values while it, perhaps more curiously, at times seems also to encourage traditionally feminine sentiment and behavior between men.
Likewise, Althorpe, narrator of Brown's work of short fiction "Somnambulism," lives with his uncle near a wilderness known as Norwood, where he becomes a somnambulist, transforming him into an unknowable and uncontrollable other.
(Side note: By 1958, Dave Elman expected each physician to achieve somnambulism on virtually all patients in under one minute and to demonstrate this in class in order to successfully complete the course.)
A source said: "The woman suffers from somnambulism, which means she sometimes sleepwalks in the middle of the night.
A specialist in somnambulism tells Dad that he needs to visit his home and family in Algeria.
Several sleep disorders causing behaviors in sleep can be considered in the differential diagnosis, such as sleep walking (somnambulism), sleep terrors, nocturnal seizures, nightmares, psychogenic dissociative states, post-traumatic stress disorder, nocturnal panic disorder, delirium and malingering.
While Balzac uses this "tempete sous crane" to preface his discussion of the dangers of somnambulism, Epstein appropriates the scene in order to convey visually the shifts in his protagonist's mental state.