song thrush

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Related to song thrushes: mistle thrush

song thrush

a common Old World thrush, Turdus philomelos, that has a brown back and spotted breast and is noted for its song
References in periodicals archive ?
Niger seeds are a magnet for goldfinch and siskin, while fat balls are enjoyed by blackbirds, tits, collared dove, house sparrows and song thrushes.
The molecular genetic analysis, histopathologic examination, and immunohistochemical testing confirmed encephalitis caused by USUV in 2 migratory wintering song thrushes who died during a small mortality event in southern Spain.
Last year, Make Your Nature Count results reported a good year for breeding song thrushes and this year's results confirmed that, with sightings of adult song thrushes, up by 12 per cent on last year.
Hanging a couple of feeders with the right mix of seeds will help attract a variety of common species such as robins, blackbirds and song thrushes on a regular basis, and provide the photographer with a chance to observe the distinguishing markings, habits and behaviour.
We investigated 2 mortality events in wintering and migrating song thrushes (Turdus philomelos) in Catalonia, northeastern Spain in 2009 and 2010.
And young song thrushes were seen in five per cent of Merseyside gardens, an increase of almost a third.
The survey of more than 50,000 gardens by members of the public found that baby blackbirds, robins and song thrushes were all seen in a greater proportion of gardens than last year.
The survey also asked people to look out for breeding birds and summer migrants, with 49% of people recording baby blackbirds, while young song thrushes were recorded in 6% of gardens.
A survey found winter visits of blackbirds, song thrushes and robins at a five-year low.
Migrating from northern Europe to the Iberian Peninsula's cork forests are blackcaps, finches, robins, and song thrushes.
Research by the British Trust for Ornithology shows the crashes are contributing to declining numbers, especially of song thrushes and house sparrows.