sonoluminescence


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sonoluminescence

[¦sän·ō·ə‚lü·mə′nes·əns]
(physics)
Luminescence produced by high-frequency sound waves or by phonons.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is noteworthy that the spectroscopic analysis based on the determination of the relative vibrational level populations of excited species does not depend on total intensity of sonoluminescence. Consequently, this method is sensitive to intrabubble conditions rather than to the total number of light emitting bubbles.
Instead of simplistic adiabatic heating model, the sonochemical processes can be considered in terms of more sophisticated plasma chemical approach allowing explaining the new effects in sonochemistry as well as in sonoluminescence. One of such processes is a carbon isotope effect during sonochemical carbon monoxide disproportionation in water [49].
In the new work, Taleyarkhan and his collaborators used bursts of neutrons to fabricate clouds of short-lived, but extraordinarily large, sonoluminescence bubbles in acetone, the solvent in many nail-polish removers.
Sonoluminescence results from cavitation--bubble formation in a liquid when its pressure dips below that at which the liquid would ordinarily vaporize, permitting the microscopic gas bubbles already present to expand.
"This work is interesting because it establishes a new diagnostic [tool] that can be used to study a lot of different aspects of sonoluminescence," says Michael J.
The prospect of carrying out chemical reactions at temperatures hotter than the sun has driven scientists to explore the process known as sonoluminescence (SN: 04/29/95, p.266).
Making light from sound, known as sonoluminescence, has generated a whirl of activity among some scientists in recent years.
Although researchers have known about this effect -- called sonoluminescence -- since the 1930s, they still do not have a complete understanding of how it works (SN: 10/23/93, p.271).
Aside from black-body radiation, they listed a number of other possible sources of illumination: crystalloluminescence, produced when chemicals crystallize; sonoluminescence, powered by the sound of bubbles collapsing; triboluminescence, created when rock crystals crack; and Cerenkov radiation and scintillation, both caused by the radioactive decay of elements in the vent water.
Researchers have known about this pehnomenon, called sonoluminescence, for more than 50 years, but they have yet to come up with a complete, convincing explanation of how the temporary collapse of a bubble can concentrate the energy of a sound wave more than a trillion times and excite atoms and molecules into producing light (SN: 5/11/92, p.
Researchers have known about sonoluminescence -- the conversion of sound energy into light by acoustically driven gas bubbles -- for more than 50 years.
Flint looked for evidence of "sonoluminescence' in liquids such as dodecane, tetrachloroethylene and nitroethane.