sooty mold


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Related to sooty mold: Mealybugs

sooty mold

[′su̇d·ē ′mōld]
(mycology)
Ascomycetous fungi of the family Capnodiaceae, with dark mycelium and conidia.
(plant pathology)
A plant disease, common on Citrus species, characterized by a dense velvety layer of a sooty mold on exposed parts of the plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The honeydew attracts sooty molds that interfere with plant photosynthesis, negatively affecting plant growth and fruit yield.
(a) Immaturesand adults infesting stem, petiole, and on leaves of mahogany seedlings conducted under greenhouse conditions, (b) Detail of the macroscopic characteristic of adult female, with "H" on dorsum, (c) Sooty mold fungi on leaves.
Nevertheless, it is important to point out the growth of sooty mold, covering close to 100% of the surface of bottom leaves, only occurred in the treatment without application of insecticides in the second trial, when the whitefly population was higher.
As inefficient insect feeders, sap falls to objects below and is typically colonized by sooty mold fungi that turn the objects black.
The honeydew excretions from sucking insect feeding result in the fungal growth known as black sooty mold.
It is phytophagous (Maes 2004) and excretes a sticky substance that causes sooty mold to grow on the plant and cover leaves and branches, obstructing to some level the plant breathing, transpiration and photosynthesis (Querino et al.
The honeydew's stickiness and the black sooty mold that grows on it can make a mess of plants and anything under infested trees.
Black sooty mold fungus may cover parts of the plant; heavily infested twigs and branches may die.
Allopeas gracile was omnivorous, feeding on green plants (vegetables, weeds, and flowers), fungi (cultivated mushroom and sooty mold), and animal matter (dead cockroaches and earthworms), but not decaying vegetation (tree leaves).
Either you actually see them or you observe their cast-off skins (seen as small white bits of matter) or the shiny, sticky "honeydew' is seen, or as a black sooty mold when a particular fungus colonizes the sugar-rich honeydew.
Like aphids and many other sucking insects, mealybugs must take in great quantities of plant fluids, and therefore secrete a lot of liquid waste called "honeydew." Honeydew promotes the growth of a black fungus called sooty mold, so a significant infestation of mealybugs creates a black, sticky mess.
As it builds up on leaves, a heavy black fungus called sooty mold soon proliferates.