sound card


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sound card

[′sau̇n kärd]
(computer science)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sound card

A plug-in optional circuit card for an IBM PC. It provides high-quality stereo sound output under program control. A "multimedia" PC usually includes a sound card. One of the best known is the Sound Blaster.

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

sound card

Also called a "sound board" or "audio adapter," it is a plug-in card that records and plays back sound. Supporting both digital audio and MIDI, sound cards provide an input port for a microphone or other sound source and output ports to speakers and amplifiers. Sound circuits are typically built into the chipset on the motherboard, but can be disabled if a separate sound card is installed. See Sound Blaster, AC'97 and HD Audio.

Digital Audio
Digital audio files contain soundwaves converted into digital form. Sound cards convert the digital samples back into analog waves for the speakers using digital signal processing (DSP). See sampling, digital audio and DSP.

MIDI
MIDI files contain a coded representation of the notes of musical instruments such as middle C on the piano. Taking considerably less space than digital audio, MIDI files require a wavetable synthesizer on the card, which holds digitized samples of the instruments. See MIDI.


Anatomy of a Sound Card
PC sound cards typically have all the components in this picture. Some have only one output, which may be amplified (Amp) or not (Buffer amp). These components may also be built directly into the motherboard. (Illustration courtesy of Peter Hermsen.)







High-End Sound Card
This Audigy card from the Creative Labs Sound Blaster family cables to an external hub that supports surround sound with seven speakers and a subwoofer. It provides a wealth of connections for A/V equipment, including ports for MIDI synthesizers and musical instruments.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But there were three conflicting objectives when optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement: (a) the gain of the analog loopback required to measure the frequency response of the sound card (right channel input loop to the right channel output); (b) the gain to amplify the microphone (right channel in); and (c) the output level to the speaker (right channel out).
The program requires a Pentium 90Mhz or faster, and a full-duplex sound card.
In addition, OctiVox enabled Internet phones will streamline any user's installation with automatic setup and control of almost any combination of OS and sound cards with its built-in knowledge base of numerous non-compliant audio driver implementations.
If Windows is not sensing your sound card, the motherboard is not aware the sound card is there.
QuoVE(TM) - VE2102XE / "Simon" -- is the mid level QuoVE(TM) workstation, equipped with dual video cards (Oxygen(R) GVX1 Pro AGP 64MB lead card) , 133 MHz front side bus, dual Intel(R) Pentium(R) III 1 Gig processors, 512 Meg 800 MHz Rambus Ram memory, Platinum 5.1 Sound Card, 10,000 rpm Ultra 36Gig hard drive, and room to expand within a functional custom case.
Best Data Products is celebrating its 15th year of manufacturing an extensive line of data communications products including, analog modems, home networking products, 2D/3D graphics boards, sound cards, digital music players and other digital products for home and office use.
Hardware: 133 MHz Pentium PC or higher; Windows 95, 98, or NT 4.0 or higher; 64 MB RAM recommended; 70 MB free disk space for minimum installation, CD-ROM, Intellimouse recommended; sound card recommended with 800 x 600 or better resolution.
Listeners need a computer with a sound card, speakers and a G2 Real Player, which can be downloaded free at the station's web site, www.Zero24-7.org.
Multimedia PC, Windows 3.1 or higher, 486DX2/66MHz or higher, 8MB RAM, 256 SVGA monitor, 4x CD-ROM drive, sound card. Macintosh version on same CD.
The six most critical elements of a VR system are microprocessor speed, amount of RAM, sound card, microphone, VR software, and the user--not necessarily in that order.
Requires multimedia PC or compatible, Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0, 16 MB RAM, 3 MB free hard-disk space, MIDI/WAVE sound card (MIDI wave-table sound card recommended), 486/66 DX2 (32-bit) processor (Pentium recommended), double-speed CD-ROM drive, VGA+ display (256 colors; SVGA 1024 x 768 with 65,536 colors recommended), headphones or speakers, mouse, and keyboard; a laser printer is optional but recommended.