sound carrier

sound carrier

[′sau̇nd ‚kar·ē·ər]
(communications)
The television carrier that is frequency-modulated by the sound portion of a television program; the unmodulated center frequency of the sound carrier is 4.5 megahertz higher than the video carrier frequency for the same television channel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Norwegian Air isn't the most financially sound carrier, and just being one aircraft short will have a financial impact on its operations -- although it's lucky the carrier is currently in a quieter January period, as opposed to the summer months, in which it operates an ambitious, high-frequency schedule, reliant on its entire fleet.
Clients are willing to shop a little harder and move away from the name carriers if they can find a financially sound carrier with good rates."
NTSC m PAL B,G PAL N Lines/Fields 525/60 625/50 625/50 Horizontal Frequency 15.734 kHz 15.625 kHz 15.625 kHz Vertical Frequency 60 Hz 50 Hz 50 Hz Color Subcarrier 3.579545 4.433618 3.582056 Frequency MHz MHz MHz Video Bandwidth 4.2 MHz 5.0 MHz 4.2 MHz Sound Carrier 4.5 MHz 5.5 MHz 4.5 MHz PAL M SECAM D,K,L Lines/Fields 525/60 625/50 Horizontal Frequency 15.750 kHz 15.625 kHz Vertical Frequency 60 Hz 50 Hz Color Subcarrier 3.575611 Frequency MHz Video Bandwidth 4.2 MHz 6.0 MHz Sound Carrier 4.5 MHz 6.5 MHz Table 1: The fundamental differences between the major TV standards.
The Super Audio CD format delivers the highest form of sonic purity with unprecedented frequency response and dynamic range, and is recognized by critics, music industry professionals and consumers as the next generation sound carrier, markedly superior to standard CDs.
The collection of sound recordings covers the early days of sound carrier production in the 19th century to digital sound recordings, with systematic collection since the 1960s.
The launch of the compact disc (CD) in 1982 was the first major technological development in sound carriers since the introduction of the tape cassette circa 1970.
Its holdings currently amount to approximately 388,000 scores, 40,000 music manuscripts, 92,000 music sound carriers, 330 archives of musicians, and 164,000 music books and music periodicals.
Being made of unstable base materials, sound carriers are more subject to damage caused by inadequate handling.
Puget Sound carriers have begun taking creative steps to alleviate these costs.