sound channel

sound channel

[′sau̇nd ‚chan·əl]
(acoustics)
A layer of seawater extending from about 2300 feet (700 meters) down to about 4950 feet (1500 meters), in which sound travels at about 1485 feet (450 meters) per second, the slowest it can travel in seawater; below 4950 feet (1500 meters) the speed of sound increases as a result of pressure.
(electronics)
The series of stages that handles only the sound signal in a television receiver.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hughes's methodology demonstrates the interplay of the sound channel with movement that is embodied not only in the choreography of the film but also through cinematographic editing, especially the variation of film speeds.
Miniaturization through sound channel configuration utilizing sound diffraction and miniature omnidirectional microphones
"While its residual brand equity will have its devices flying off the shelf in the first few quarters, sustaining interest will need strong marketing, a well-designed product portfolio and a sound channel strategy." The marketing has already begun, with HMD Global setting in motion a high powered $500 million global campaign for three years.
The system is designed to take advantage of a unique combination of conditions that creates a sound channel in the Arctic Ocean.
Comparing with the old version, the new availability has been endowed with several new functionalities like ripping DVD files to various digital media players, extracting audio or video from DVD files, customizing sound channel and caption, transferring videos for iPhone 5 as well as any other iOS 6 supported players.
since 1991) explain how sound can travel in the ocean over hundreds and thousands of kilometers along a natural refractive waveguide called the underwater sound channel. It had been analyzed using standard wave models since World War II, but in the early 1980s, a new factor was discovered that to a significant extent determines the structure of the wave field at long ranges.
The desired sounds were achieved at less power by creating a direct sound channel toward the driver and providing total separation of the speaker's front and back sound waves.
Down at about 2,600 feet (800 meters), sound travels through a deep sound channel for thousands of miles across the entire ocean.
Oceans have a "deep sound channel" in which noise can travel for hundreds of miles.
The listening stations lie hundreds of yards below the ocean surface, at a depth where sound waves become trapped in a layer of water known as the 'deep sound channel'.
A voice-activated sound channel allows whoever speaks to be seen automatically on screen.