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Related to sources: Primary sources

source

1. 
a. a spring that forms the starting point of a stream; headspring
b. the area where the headwaters of a river rise
2. anything, such as a story or work of art, that provides a model or inspiration for a later work
3. Electronics the electrode region in a field-effect transistor from which majority carriers flow into the interelectrode conductivity channel

Source

 

the point of origin of a river.

The source, which may be a lake outlet or a stream receiving its water from a spring, swamp, or glacier, ordinarily corresponds to the place where the permanent channel of the watercourse appears. In a river system having multiple sources, the main source is considered the one farthest from the mouth and largest in volume. It is not unusual for the main channel of a river and its sources to have different names; for instance, the Severnaia Dvina is formed by the confluence of the Sukhona and the lug, the Amur by that of the Shilka and Argun’.

source

[sȯrs]
(electricity)
The circuit or device that supplies signal power or electric energy or charge to a transducer or load circuit.
(electronics)
The terminal in a field-effect transistor from which majority carriers flow into the conducting channel in the semiconductor material.
(mathematics)
The vertex with indegree 0 that is specified in the definition of an s-t network.
(nucleonics)
A radioactive material packaged so as to produce radiation for experimental or industrial use.
(physics)
In general, a device that supplies some extensive entity, such as energy, matter, particles, or electric charge.
A point, line, or area at which mass or energy is added to a system, either instantaneously or continuously.
A point at which lines of force in a vector field originate, such as a point in an electrostatic field where there is positive charge.
(spectroscopy)
The arc or spark that supplies light for a spectroscope.
(thermodynamics)
A device that supplies heat.

source

source

(1) One side of a field effect transistor. See drain.

(2) The point of creation. See source code and source document.

(3) (The Source) An online information service in McLean, VA, launched in 1979 and purchased by CompuServe in 1989. See CompuServe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conduct BV seminars for your referral sources and offer CLE and CPE credit (the NASBA Web site, www.nasba.
Given our current level of understanding, it has become clear that characterization of the source zone and the degree of uncertainty associated with that characterization are of critical importance in site assessment.
A new pulsed neutron source is under construction at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF).
By changing the light source used in measurement instruments to a source well known in the optical industry and described as D65, the enhanced brightness or whiteness of papers to which FWAs have been added can be numerically shown and compared on, for example, ream wrappers of printing and writing papers.
Three high-profile cases of reporters being subpoenaed to reveal their sources highlight the innumerable cases of federal courts aggressively pursuing journalists:
Most industry sources agree that the support of resin producers and processors is not as essential to success of the new plastics futures as is the support of financial intermediaries and the investment banking community.
(11) News organizations rely more on elite official sources (such as government press offices) who are easy to reach and eager to place their messages in the press.
Nonresidents are generally liable for tax on their state-specific source income.
The investigation of the Chicago grocery showed that processed meats were being stored at improper temperatures and that potential sources of cross-contamination were not controlled (i.e., cutting boards and utensils were inadequately sanitized, and the same scale was used for raw meats as well as cooked pork).
They wanted to trumpet what they were told by certain dubious sources, and they proceeded accordingly.
Not only does it offer a detailed guide to the sources, it integrates recent work from the fields of organology and iconography, archival and patronage studies, performance practice, and the analogous area of lute music, resulting in a coverage that is impressively inclusive in the best sense of the word.
Library and information scientists are legitimately concerned with quality issues that do go beyond accuracy, such as the accessibility, relevance, comprehensibility, and navigability of information sources. However, as Peter Hernon (1995, p.