space motion

space motion

[′spās ‚mō·shən]
(astronomy)
Motion of a celestial body through space.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Aside from space motion sickness, astronauts face a host of other risks in space such as radiation, isolation, harsh environments and others.
In 1995, Bronstein [9] suggested that it was the expression of enhanced visual dependence in patients with an undetected vestibular problem and coined the term "visual vertigo." Other terms that are clinically used include "space motion discomfort" and "visual vestibular mismatch" [6].
Compared to VPC from point features, the VPC method proposed in this paper has advanced task space motion characteristics.
(10) shows a typical full arm simulated joint space motion. This is based on the full arm dynamic model already derived in SECTION (III).
TOKYO - Japanese astronaut Satoshi Furukawa posted his first Twitter messages from space Tuesday, marveling at the roominess felt inside the International Space Station as it can be used three-dimensionally due to zero gravity, while also revealing that he was suffering from space motion sickness.
Their study jettisons the theory that astronauts' headaches are normally caused by space motion sickness, after showing that more than three-quarters of those studied had no connection.
Space motion sickness monitoring experiment: Spacelab 1.
The anti-emetic properties of 1-sulpiride in a ground-based model of space motion sickness.
Spaceflight induces a cephalad redistribution of fluid volume and blood flow within the human body and space motion sickness, which is a problem during first few days of spaceflight, could be related to these changes in fluid status and in blood flow of the cerebrum and vestibular system.
developed at NASA as a treatment for space motion sickness is effective in helping patients control GI motility symptoms, including nausea and vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain, and early satiety.
VIT may surprise you to know that, on 79 US Space Shuttle missions, 94 per cent of astronauts used some medication during flight and half of it was for the relief of space motion sickness!
Performance during a space mission may be degraded for a number of reasons other than a direct effect of microgravity on the central nervous system: for example, postural instability caused by weightlessness, fatigue, sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm desynchronization, the distraction of space motion sickness, and various other unpleasant physical symptoms in the form of facial edema, headaches, and nasal congestion (Christensen & Talbot, 1986; Kornilova, 1997; Manzey & Lorenz, 1998).

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