sparganosis


Also found in: Medical.

sparganosis

[‚spär·gə′nō·səs]
(veterinary medicine)
An infection by the plerocercoid larva, or sparganum, of certain species of Spirometra; the adult form normally occurs in the intestine of dogs and cats.
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* Molecular Identification of Spirometra erinaceieuropaei in Cases of Human Sparganosis, Hong Kong
in the reference is used for diagnosis of sparganosis mansoniother than clonorchiasis.[6] Wang et al .
** Example 2: Keisuke Goto, MD, a pathologist in Japan, shared microscopic images of a very classic case of sparganosis on the Dermatopathology Facebook group.
Australian feral pigs threaten to spread many of the same diseases as those in the U.S., with the notable additions of Sparganosis (a parasite that infests human muscle, forming encyst lumps) and Melioidosis (a bacterial disease causing abscesses of the internal organs).
The importance of wildlife as reservoirs of human diseases has also been widely recognized for most of the parasitic zoonoses, including American and African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, balantidiasis, fascioliasis, opisthorchiasis, clonorchiasis, paragonimiasis, schistosomiasis, echinococcosis, taeniasis, diphyllobothriasis, sparganosis, dipylidiasis, trichinellosis, toxocariasis, strongyloidiasis, and Ancylostoma caninum and A.
Spargana of Spirometra can parasitize in human body and result in sparganosis, which is an important foodborne parasitic zoonosis [1].
multilocularis Larva Alveolar cyst Multilocular cysts disease Diphyllobothrium Adult Fish tapeworm Pernicious anemia latum Hymenolepis nana Adult Dwarf tapeworm Rarely symptomati Spirometra Larva Sparganosis Subcutaneous larva mansonoides Table 2.
Sparganosis is a parasitic infection caused by the plerocercoid larvae of the genus Spirometra.
Eosinophilic cystitis caused by vesical sparganosis: a case report.
[Human sparganosis. Report of a probable 7th case in South America and review of the subject].
According to the study, people can also catch certain diseases (trichinosis, pentastomiasis, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis) by eating reptile meat.
In this case, humans serve as intermediate hosts and this is called sparganosis (Figure 6-36).