spark excitation

spark excitation

[′spärk ‚ek‚sī′tā·shən]
(spectroscopy)
The use of an electric spark (10,000 to 30,000 volts) to excite spectral line emissions from otherwise hard-to-excite samples; used in emission spectroscopy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spark excitation involves a brief electrical discharge, while arc excitation uses an alternating current.
The accuracy of spectrometers was improved with advances in spark excitation sources.
In arc excitation, atoms are released by a continuous electrical discharge, while spark excitation uses current pulse.
The M3030 offers both arc and spark excitation. Full analytical performance using spark excitation may be performed on site with argon gas and some sample preparation, or the system can shift to arc excitation to produce semi-quantitative analysis.